Jun 132009
 
Nokia wireless recharging

Nokia wireless recharging

A cell phone that never needs recharging might sound too good to be true, but Nokia says it’s developing technology that could draw enough power from ambient radio waves to keep a cell-phone handset topped up. Ambient electromagnetic radiation–emitted from Wi-Fi transmitters, cell-phone antennas, TV masts, and other sources–could be converted into enough electrical current to keep a battery topped up, says Markku Rouvala, a researcher from the Nokia Research Centre, in Cambridge, U.K.

In a way this is perfectly logical.  It’s just a direct reversal of the way that radio and all other electromagnetic waves are produced in the first place, and it’s surprising that it took so long for someone to come up with it. We already convert electromagnetic waves into electrical signals every time we turn on a phone, radio or television. These electrical signals are then converted to sound, or picture by whatever we’re listening with or watchin and  it seems to be a natural progressionto convert them back to electricity that can be stored in a battery. It’s not as if there isn’t enough wasted energy signals flying around the place with phone masts hidden everywhere.

Nikola Tesla first demonstrated this technology in the 18th century and demonstrated working wireless transmission way back in 1893. His attempts to build a transmitter to send electricity across the Atlantic are the stuff of legend, but Nokia have gone down a far simpler route.

The system involves a wide band antenna which will pick up signals from 500 megahertz to 10 gigahertz and two electrical circuits.   One converts the electromagnetic waves into an electrical current, while the second circuit is designed to feed this current to the battery to recharge it. The trick is making these circuits use less energy than they receive to allow for the overflow to be used to charge a battery. The second trick is making it small enough to fit into a phone. Starting off it’s not going to charge your phone for you but it will generate a top-up charge which will make your phone last much much longer.  Combine it with some photovoltaic cellphone covers and the thing is flying.

Interesting stuff, This is another real-time projec, and not one for the long finger, Nokia reckon they’ll have it in phones within three years.

More links HERE, HERE and HERE

  12 Responses to “Nokia design free wireless charging for new phones.”

Comments (12)
  1.  

    This sort of Technology has been widely used for years in ID cards. You know those one where you wave it in front of the black box reader and it goes beep and the door opens or you “scan” in to work or in places with inegrated public transport where you can touch the card on the reader and it lets you into the subway etc. In most cases you don’t even need to take the card out of your wallet.
    These cards have a chip in them with your details on it and when you put it next to the reader thats emitting an Electromagnetic field it “induces” enough charge or power for the chip in the card to work.
    Essentially it’s just a coil of wire. No battery required.

  2.  

    So there goes another excuse. As the pointy headed ones power full steam ahead with the full implementation of this technology who will spare a thought for the millions of innocent men out there, the tens of thousands of desperate males ensconced in darkened lounge bars from Guadalajara to Tom Collins.

    When she that must be obeyed tried to call and gets only the answering machine, they used explain, later that day, much later, closer to evening, maybe even in proximity to midnight, “the phone went dead, remind me to charge it in future, won’t you love, missed you, ahem………”

    Admit it, you have turned off your phone. And fear and terror has been struck into your heart when some wretches text tone – which is similar to your own – sounds. No need to look at the message. It reads.

    “Where are you”

    Note, there will be no question mark after the you part. They are telling you where are you – and you are merely obliged to confirm their worse suspicions by return.

    But now because of those daft fucks Nokia and their ever lasting soon to be on the market bastard battery another reliable alibi bites the dust.

    This is all a feminist conspiracy I tell thee. We marveled when the mobile phone was introduced.But little did we realise that our inalienable right as men to disappear into the bowels of a public house was being eroded, that technology was being used to stalk us, that big sister was watching, and waiting.

  3.  

    The principle of generating a current by moving a coil through a magnetic field has been known for more than a century, but this is the first time I heard of technology to do something similar using electromagnetic radiation.

    Just goes to show how little I know.

  4.  

    And that, dear sorrah, is why y’employ me,
    to deal with all those fiddly little details loike keepin de ship afloat, preventin de likes O’ Yersel’ fram runnin inta planets an’ makin a hames O’ everytin,
    let’s ye get on wit “Mek it So Scotty” an’ odder such loike claptrap.

  5.  

    Crystal sets didn’t have any battery.

  6.  

    i have some idea,,nokia make feature phone,,phone no need battary,,only work with radio wave (rvr)power…contact:09555273770 mail id,,,lastwap@yahoo.com

  7.  

    car control,,lights off,,by new nokia (f-phone) how…lastwap@yahoo.com

  8.  

    This is the coolest technology ever!! It will revolutionize the phone industry and how battery is managed!

  9.  

    ESB mightn’t like it though… : )

  10.  

    Dear sir,
    I am a Engineering student i have some idea about wireless charging. I want to implement this, so i want some clarifications from you how do i clear my clarifications ?

  11.  

    Your clarifications should already be clear. Unclear clarifications lead to lack of clarity.

  12.  

    This is quite interesting. I wonder how would this new technology come in with the existing players in teleco.

Leave a Reply