Mar 072010
 

There was much consternation recently when the Bishop of Ferns asked parishioners to help him to pay off the debts incurred, because some of the priests in the parish abused children.

Most people were of the view that this was more denial from the church, and a demonstration of unbelievable cheek.

However, you might be contributing to this fund, without even realising it.
How?

Well, if you are a tax payer, then some of your tax euros go towards running our schools. For example, paying teachers, buying resources and paying bills in general.

That’s fine, you say?

Yes, but did you know that schools are now being asked to pay a “Diocesan Contribution”?  Some Dioceses have asked for this payment for a few years, while others have started more recently.

What?

Yes, the Diocese sends out a letter to primary schools with a “request” for €1 (more in many places) per pupil in the school. They follow up with a phone call (I have been told) if the money is not paid.

If asked, the Diocese will probably tell you that this is to cover the cost of running our schools.

What costs?

The Department of Education and Science cover every cost.  The Catholic Church has the power, but the taxpayer foots the bills.

The Diocese might then tell you that it is to cover the cost of examining Religion in our schools every year.

Should the tax payer (through the school) fund that?

Should school principals throw this “bill” into the bin?  That’s very difficult when the Chairperson of the Board of Management (the boss) is a priest, and an “employee” of the person sending out this bill (Bishop), and will probably insist on paying it.

Is this “Diocesan Contribution” going towards paying off child abuse debts?
I do not know.

Probably, yes, in one way or another, directly or indirectly.

How do you feel about that?

  19 Responses to “Are you Paying off the Catholic Church’s Child Abuse Debts?”

Comments (19)
  1.  

    “If asked, the Diocese will probably tell you that this is to cover the cost of running our schools.”

    huh? are the Catholic Church the Munchausens of the modern world, that they are trying to pull themselves up with their own hair?

    That’s like making a string longer by adding a bit that’s been cut off from the other end.

  2.  

    Yes, Kae!
    I don’t know what these costs are supposed to be?

    The governing body of most primary schools is the CPSMA – Catholic Primary School Management Association. They will claim that they need help to cover overheads, administration expenses etc…
    However, this is also taken from the tax payer’s pocket in the form of an administration grant.
    Schools might also pay membership fees.

  3.  

    Any fear that the church have been asked to justifiy the costs by headmasters, boards of management etc?

  4.  

    Very little fear of that, it would be like the butler questioning the Master…..
    Many would like to question it, I’m sure of that.

  5.  

    The infamous Minister Woods “deal” is, of course, an even bigger way that our children are being asked to pay for the rape, torture and abuse of the children of past generations. The Department of Education became directly responsible for the burden of compensation assumed by the State. The probable €billion+ compensation burden cuts down, by a corresponding amount, the funds available for the actual education of the current generation of children. (But, thanks, Mairead, I hadn’t known about the diocesan contribution before – I’ll try to find out whether it applies in my local schools).

  6.  

    Good idea, Scotlyn.
    The more questions that are asked, the better.
    You’re right about Mr. Fianna Fail Woods of course. He sold us down the swanny and our children’s education with us.

  7.  

    Read all about it HERE

  8.  

    I thought that was a great post at the time, Bock, and it’s still shocking.
    How did Woods get away with it?

  9.  

    Because both Woods and Ahern are members of the Knights of Columbanus, a disgraceful self-serving secretive Catholic brotherhood that was originally set up to counter the Freemasons.

    The organisation permeates Irish society, administration and politics. It exists to promote conservative Catholic mores and to advance its members’ financial interests. Many significant property developers and construction professionals are members and it is central to the construction feeding frenzy that has destroyed our economy.

    I’ll be writing a comprehensive report on some of this stuff in due course.

  10.  

    The catholic church, through the priests and nuns who chair boards of management, handles millions in school moneys. I never see any accounts. What would you expect to happen to these moneys in the hands of mental reservationists?
    The catholic clergy are professional scroungers. Money is slipped to them at weddings, funerals and horse races. They are the ultimate envelope men. Priestly visits to the sick and elderly increase on dole days. They are a moral and financial black hole. This scrounging is widely accepted as good and proper.
    But that’s only the money. What’s much more damaging is the fact that they appoint and promote teachers. The board of management of any catholic primary school is chaired and controlled by a cleric. The boards are stacked with selected parents and bishop’s appointees. They’re not going to appoint anyone who will rock the boat. Boards also have a so-called teacher representative, but once on the board, their role is not to represent the teachers. In fact, they are subject to conditions of confidentiality that can prevent them from informing teachers of matters discussed at the board meetings.
    These school boards of management are a mask of democracy hiding the faces of despots.
    These boards do not appoint teachers for their abilities and suitability to teaching, but for their loyalism to the church.
    They do not promote teachers to higher posts on any other basis than religious loyalism. Any priest managing a catholic primary school would prefer to give the principalship to a devout orangutan than to an agnostic superteacher.
    So the schools stay cramped and fearful and mean spirited and medieval, and the children lose out, even the ones who are only there because this abject state has failed to provide them with a state school.
    One way to show church loyalism is by means of a hefty donation.
    How can men who live by accepting gifts of money be allowed to appoint and promote public servants?

  11.  

    You have made some very important points here, Leo.
    Thank you for taking the time to do that.
    Schools are supposed to keep accounts, and a aelection are supposed to be audited.
    I wonder, are they?
    Every grant received has a specific purpose.
    I have never heard of a Diocesan Contribution grant.
    There isn’t one.

    As you say, that’s only the money.
    It is scary to think of the power that the Catholic church have over education.
    They have absolute power, because they employ the teachers, principals and all staff and promote them if they are good, obedient boys and girls.
    The very fact that the dioceses can issue a letter asking for money from cash-strapped schools shows this power too. It is taking money that rightfully belongs to children… but we’ve seen what they think of children.

  12.  

    ” … if they are good, obedient boys and girls.” Yes Máiréad.
    If you want a job as a teacher, if you want a transfer to another school, or a promotion, you have to entertain these guys. You feed them in your house and shove a few quid in their pockets. You never miss mass with its collection plate. You pay adequate dues to the support of your pastor in the appropriate envelope.
    It’s catholic freemasonry. It’s Irish corruption. It’s all laid down in the rules and circulars of the Department of Education and Science. They have you by the ethos.
    If you don’t keep up these gestures of homage, your career goes nowhere and difficulties are pushed in your way by these “christians.”
    Perhaps the most ironic of the pontiff’s titles is “servus servorum dei.” Now the pope is not the servant of the servants of god, but it aptly describes the lot of the teacher. The Irish state hands you over as a chattle, to do the bidding of priests. And to cough up money over and over again to keep them sweet.
    And dare anyone ask them where it goes!
    Then the schools are topheavy with loyalist staff. They rise by promotions and in the unions. They sit on school boards. All the relevant agencies are tainted in this way. A little empire dominates by mind control and omerta.
    It stinks.

  13.  

    Yes, it does stink, Leo.
    I have to say though that there are more and more teachers who are sick of this carry on.
    They feel unable to speak out though, because it would mean risking their jobs.
    Also, there is a very high degree of bullying in our education system – of the adults!!!
    It’s crazy.
    I have spoken up as much as I can, but no member of the staff would be happy if I brought “attention” to our school…..
    We were “trained” in “training colleges” (!!!) to do as we are told.
    How can we produce thinkers, when we can’t think for ourselves?
    Root and branch changes are needed.

  14.  

    It occured to me while driving past Lelia church in Ballynanty that they recently got a new car park. This was built on what used to be a green area adjacent the church. The land is not owned by the church and presumably is owned by the Council (the people of Limerick).
    It is reasonable to presume the Council paid for the extensive work to provide this tarmacadamed car park.

    I never gave this any thought until I read the above. The council paying for a car park to a public amenity makes sense. For example parking outside a chool or health centre. But I’m not sure a church should fall under this category.

    Nancy blakes when they have good music is a public amenity for me. The Milk market on saturday is an amnenity for me. If the council can give land and pay for the construction of parking space for the church, which most of us don’t attend, then using the same logic, shouldn’t they pay for parking to other venues which arguably provide more spritual upliftment.

  15.  

    @Builderfromhell – in the case of the car-park, I think you could have stopped it by submitting a complaint when it was still undergoing planning permission.

  16.  

    BFH — There’s a constitutional prohibition on the State endowing any individual religion. Imagine that!

  17.  

    BFH, you would probably be shocked at the property the church actually owns!
    For example, when a new school is built the locals sometimes want to turn the old school into a community centre.
    Problem – the Patron owns it.
    Often, the locals do all the work, put in all the money and work to build a spanking new community centre or a sports hall instead of the tumbled down old school, and guess what?
    They don’t own it.
    The Bishop owns it, having put zero into the re-building.
    The local community have to lease it from the Bishop (IF he will agree to that!!!), and often it’s only for 25 years or so.
    Now, 25 years wouldn’t be long in passing, and it all reverts back then and the Bishop can sell it out from under the locals, who think they own it because they paid for it (fundraised) and built it.
    That’s what happened first day with schools – local farmers donated the land, locals did the building and now? The locals have no rights, the Bishop owns it outright.
    It’s one thing to have a school whipped from you in 1850, but in 2010?

  18.  

    I had reason recently to carry out a bit of research into the ” Good Shepherd ” group, Those ” Brides of Christ ” who came to Ireland to rescue ” fallen women ” strange their interpretation of “rescue ” , I digress.
    I discovered that they had a property portfolio valued at 14.9 million, They were a relatively very small group, Can’t even imagine what the portfolio of RC group is worth.

  19.  

    Now the whole country is seeing what the catholic clergy really are, what the Murphy report identified as their consistent characteristic: they are underhand and overbearing.
    Their sneaky bully culture is everywhere in evidence. As is fitting, the chief wizard is now also revealed as a sneaky bully. This is the culture of every school they “own”.
    The Minister for Education and Science allows her public servants, teachers, to be interviewed and appointed, hired and fired, stifled or promoted by sneaky bullies who live on backhanders, priests. The implications for education are dire. No wonder a Leaving Cert is now as hollow as a Bank of Ireland share.

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