Jun 162012
 

You just couldn’t make it up, could you?  Tom McFeely has appealed to the British courts as a UK citizen to protect him from the Irish people he ripped off.

Seriously now.  As Oscar Wilde remarked in a different context, only a man with a heart of stone could fail to laugh at it.  Here’s a guy who objected so strongly to the existence of Northern Ireland that he was willing to shoot a policeman, go to prison and spend 63 days on hunger strike.

Yet, now that his disgracefully shoddy building work has caught up with him, McFeely is seeking bankruptcy in Britain.

Why?  Because, as he correctly pointed out to the British court, the Irish bankruptcy laws are punitive, often amounting to a life sentence — not unlike the life sentence imposed on those who bought his death-trap apartments at Priory Hall.  McFeely wanted to avail of the more lenient UK bankruptcy regime, and in support of his claim, he pointed out that he is not a citizen of Ireland, but of the United Kingdom.

Nice.

Of course, in making his initial application for bankruptcy back in January, Tom neglected to advise the registrar of one vital fact: that he was already involved in a legal dispute in another jurisdiction — a dispute with Theresa McGuinness who bought a house from him in 2006 and had to spend €100,000 repairing it.  Theresa is clearly not a quitter, and followed Tom as far as the London High Court to have his bankruptcy status overturned, a legal action which ultimately  proved successful.  Portraying himself as victim, Tom tried to convince the court that Theresa McGuinness was taking a vindictive action, but the court told him to get stuffed and now he has to apply all over again for protection from legal action in what he called a foreign jurisdiction: Ireland.

Isn’t it amazing that Tom McFeely doesn’t recognise Ireland as a legitimate entity, despite living here, working here, operating a business here and ripping off our citizens, forcing many of them into financial slavery for the rest of their lives?  And isn’t it even more amazing, given his professed political convictions, that he would now hide behind his British citizenship?

I’m genuinely puzzled.  When he travels, what passport does he use?

If and when Theresa McGuinness manages to prevent his bankruptcy as a UK citizen, and starts to put the screws on him in Ireland, will the residents of Priory Hall do the same?  Will they all try to nail him for the money they lost as a result of his bad building, and what will he do if things get too hard?

Supposing, for instance, he has to move out of his €10 million mansion.  What on earth will he do? [Update 10th Aug 2012.  McFeely’s house repossessed by Nama.]

Well, he can’t shoot anyone, obviously, but he could always go on hunger strike.  It might do him no harm for a while.

 

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Previously.  Priory Hall Builder Gets UK Bankruptcy

 

Elsewhere, Susan McKay writes in the Guardian

  40 Responses to “Tom McFeely Claims Protection as a UK Citizen”

Comments (40)
  1.  

    Poor Tom,a man should be able to switch allegiance whenever he feels the urge.The man should be strung up by the balls.On a connected note,is there no building inspection regime in Ireland?or is it all done on a nod and wink.The reason I ask is that I heard a TD in the Dail describing a block of flats he was in while campaigning.He said the walls between each flat and in the corridors was made of plaster slabs.Did he mean plasterboard?.In any case he said someone had put their boot through a corridor wall while having a row with a neighbour.I am truly astonished at this.

  2.  

    That should have read were made of of plaster slabs,sorry.

  3.  

    It has nothing to do with nod and wink. It has to do with the fact that we don’t employ enough inspectors, but of course, we do have a bloated public sector, don’t we?

  4.  

    Should’nt Dublin city council or whatever it is called carry the can for allowing this to happen.Are the building inspectors,engineers and architects employed by the council stupid,blind or on the take.It has to be one of those and whichever one it is they should be told in very short letters to fuck for good.Shortage of staff is not an excuse for not doing your job properly.I know that if I were a resident of Priory Hall I would be after the council like a like something possessed.

  5.  

    Tom McFeely is to blame. He built it.

    Here’s a figure that might put it in context. There are more building inspectors in Belfast city than there are in the entire republic, including Dublin.

  6.  

    That is truly a third world figure.How does one get house insurance or a loan to buy the property in the first place without certification or some assurance that the property was ok in the first place.I am sorry to be so ignorant about those matters because I have lived in the UK for a long time now.

  7.  

    Local authorities have been given no role in certifying buildings. That’s the responsibility of the supervising architect or engineer.

    After all, if my new car turned out to be defective and injured me, would I have a case against the Gardai for not spotting it?

    Caveat emptor: don’t buy a new house unless the person signing the cert has proper professional indemnity and qualifications.

  8.  

    No you would have a case against the manufacturer.Does it not follow that the supervising architect or engineer is responsible.Many cars have been recalled by manufacturers because faults have been found after they’ve been sold.There is a very big anomaly
    here somewhere.It’s the old story Bock people not taking responsibility for their actions and very weak regulation both at local and government level.

  9.  

    You’re right. The manufacturer, or in this case the builder, Tom McFeely. The supervising architect is also responsible, not the local authority.

  10.  

    Caveat emptor my arse.. I don’t think so Bock.
    You buy a dodgy car, you’re not out on the streets..

    Let’s face facts, we don’t put people out on the streets in this country.
    If people end up buying homes that turn out to be death traps, it’s not a case of caveat emptor. Bottom line – they won’t be able to afford two mortgages.. and they’ll have to be housed somewhere.

    Here, Mr. Geek gives a good overview of the system in this country on this thread, that in his opinion ‘borders on the ridiculous’

    http://bocktherobber.com/2012/06/former-ira-man-asks-court-for-stay-on-e10-million-repossession/

    Anyways, not meaning to take anything away from that utter fucking crook Tom McFeely. I can’t understand why he isn’t in jail and every penny taken from him to help the misfortunes that bought a home from him.
    He clearly is a shameless man.
    And of course he is responsible.. but what are those people going to get from him?
    I think the dept of the environment bare some responsibility. We don’t have competent systems in place to prevent the likes of Tom McFeely building dumps.

  11.  

    Caveat emptor my arse.. I don’t think so Bock.
    You buy a dodgy car, you’re not out on the streets..

    Let’s face facts, we don’t put people out on the streets in this country.
    If people end up buying homes that turn out to be death traps, it’s not a case of caveat emptor..bottom line – they won’t be able to afford two mortgages.. and they’ll have to be housed somewhere.

    Here, Mr. Geek gives a good overview of the system in this country on this thread, that in his opinion ‘borders on the ridiculous’

    bocktherobber.com/2012/06/former-ira-man-asks-court-for-stay-on-e10-million-repossession/

    Anyways, not meaning to take anything away from that utter fucking crook Tom McFeely. I can’t understand why he isn’t in jail and every penny taken from him to help the misfortunes that bought a home from him.
    He clearly is a shameless man.

    You can say he’s responsible all you like.. but that doesn’t help the people who’ve been shafted by him. I think the dept of the environment bare some responsibility. We don’t have competent systems in place to prevent the likes of Tom McFeelys building dumps.

  12.  

    Ah damn it.. comment disappeared.
    I shall be back to set you straight later Bock..

    You’re not out on your nelly if you buy a dodgy car.. big difference.

  13.  

    So why not go after the supervising architect?.No thats a silly question because he’s probably not got any insurance.Ah sure why would he take responsibility when nobody else does.Do local authorities in Ireland charge for planning permission and building control?.

  14.  

    What would be wrong with paying someone to check the building out before you buy, like they do everywhere else?

  15.  

    We don’t have enough inspectors or a sufficiently severe law, but don’t blame the environment department for that. Blame the Fianna Fáil government who set it up that way in the 90s so their builder cronies would get an easy ride.

  16.  

    Although Mcfeely is a scumbag of the highest order,he could’nt have perpertrated this scam on his own.He was helped all the way by so called” professionals”.To my mind he merely put up the money to enable this scam.I don’t know anything about McFeely,but from my scant knowledge of him he is neither an architect nor engineer.If he pleaded ignorance in most countries he would have a fair case.I personally think he is the man in this case who enabled this scam,(for that’s what it is/was)
    and should for that reason alone be hounded for the money to fix this mess.After all when you buy even a secondhand car you will at least kick the tyres,take it for a test drive,or at least listen to the engine.As you said before Bock buyer beware,and that is a very sad reflection on the so called “professionals” in Ireland.If you cant trust them who can you trust.

  17.  

    Not just Ireland. People employ surveyors in every country because certs from architects are so limited and have so many exclusions. As for the scam, you have to follow the money. Who benefited?

  18.  

    Having said all that,here in the UK when you are buying an older house you have two types of survey.The bank or or loan company insist on a full structural survey which most people have done,because then have comeback against the surveyor.Then there is a basic survey where a surveyor comes past the house and says yes thats a house,but that is not worth the paper it’s printed on.Follow the money indeed Bock.You would think that the banks when lending money would want to know how good the investment was before releasing the money,and the same applys to the French and German banks.In other words normal commercial rules should a apply.Some you win and some you lose,in other words fuck off,you’ve lost this time.My first comment about a nod and a wink is not very far off the mark in reality.It seems to be done on a wing and a prayer hoping nothing will go wrong.

  19.  

    I think it’s very unwise to buy an apartment off the plans.

  20.  

    Couldn’t agree more,

  21.  

    Couldn’t agree more,

  22.  

    Nothing wrong with buying off the plans,one of my daughters bought off plan a couple of years ago and everything was fine.So long as your dealing with honest professionals and everyone abides by the rule of law.There seems to be a singular lack of these in Ireland at the moment in the building trade,and a complete lack of enforcement.There are some very sharp practices here in the UK as well,but in most cases people get some form of redress,which does’nt seem to happen in Ireland.

  23.  

    There isn’t a complete lack of enforcement. Builders were routinely prosecuted during the Tiger years, but the role was deliberately under-resourced by FF.

  24.  

    As you said Bock follow the money.It’s all a bit third world.

  25.  

    Definitely a bit third world, having to live in a shack or the streets..
    buyer beware.. Yeah, tough luck to those fools who weren’t very savvy buying a home that turned out to be a dump.

  26.  

    One last thing Bock you don’t need a surveyor for a new building as in most countries buildings are certified as as they are being built,and come with guarantees as to structure etc.After all you would find it odd if you had to take a new car for an nct test the day after you bought it!.There is something very wrong with a system that allows this to happen,and people like Tom McFeely just exploited it.In other words he could not have done this on his own.

  27.  

    It’s true that you wouldn’t expect to take a new car for a test, but it certainly is not certified by a government agency. Any certification you get is from the builder.

    I’m not aware of government certification for buildings in other countries but I’m not saying you’re wrong. Perhaps a few details of these schemes would help to clarify matters.

  28.  

    Look no further than the than the UK where local goverment oversee building regs,which in turn is overseen by the national goverment.The local authority will need to see certificates from Gas Safe (it used to be Corgi) and NIECCE for electricty before they will issue a completion certificate.Similar rules apply in Holland,Denmark,Germany and some other countries.I think you will find that a car like every other item that comes into a country will have been tested somewhere along the line by some goverment agency or other.In the UK various items used to have a Kite Mark now it’s a CE mark which I think is european wide.I don’t think for a moment that cars would be excluded from such scrutiny,though I dont know if cars have CE marks on them.I’m just looking at my phone charger now,and even that has got a CE mark on it.

  29.  

    The CE mark and the BS kite mark certify the design, but the individual product has not been tested by anyone.

  30.  

    As far as I’m aware the CE mark does cover design,but also covers electrical safety,mechanical safety and various other criteria.The CE organisation is based in the Netherlands,but also has a subsidiary somewhere in China.The old Kite mark stood for much the same thing.Products that have a CE mark have free acess to the EU.It’s not quite right to say the individual product has not been tested, because someone somewhere has will have tested it.

  31.  

    has will have tested it!,and no I wasn’t on the piss last night. sorry about that.

  32.  

    Yer man is a greedy arsehole,shocking how many people he has financially wrecked cause he wanted money!,Then theres Enda ,need te extrapolate!

  33.  

    It doesn’t say anything either new or at variance with that which I’ve previously read here, but the Guardian Weekend (the colour supplement) carries a reasonably lengthy article on McFeeley today, August 11th. Dunno whether the Irish edition carries the same article or not?
    If nothing else, he appears to be guilty of massive hypocrisy in first trying to kill us off and then claiming he’s “one of us”.

  34.  

    “Kill us off?” Are you serious?

    Do you really believe the Provos were trying to kill off the Brits?

    Do you have the slightest understanding of the political background to what took place in Northern Ireland? I’m no supporter of the Provos, but what you just said is worthy of the Sun.

  35.  

    Sorry?
    Balcombe St.
    Warrington.
    Horse Guards Parade.
    Regent’s Park
    Deal.
    Grand Hotel, Brighton.

    Just for starters.
    How many more would you like?
    I’m English. Or should I say British, just like the rest of the victims of the Provos.
    My cousin was one.

  36.  

    This thread is primarily about a bad builder, and I won’t let it be derailed, but I’m afraid that simplistic analysis of the northern conflict is one reason it dragged on so long. Not only did the Provos murder innocent people, but also the loyalists and, I’m bound to remind you, the British army.

    If you’re a regular visitor, you’ll know where I stand on political violence, but it’s grossly simplistic to think those IRA attacks were designed to kill off the British people. That would be sheer futility on the part of the Provos, and whatever else they were, they were certainly not stupid.

    The purpose of their activities was to bring about a 32-county republic, which is a political objective. Most people here did not agree with their violence, as you can observe from the minuscule support they received in the elections.

    I’m certainly not here to speak for them, and I’m going to call a halt shortly before this goes completely askew, but I must point out that it was only when a little more nuanced thinking was brought to bear on the problem that the violence on all sides was ended.

  37.  

    May I say, you appear to me to be a trifle defensive about this?
    Despite your professed desire to stay on subject, it seems to me that you were the one that did the derailing.
    Initially, in referring to something written in a newspaper article, I made a comment relating to the apparent nature of the man-amongst other things, as you say, a bad builder. I merely said that he appeared to be “guilty of massive hypocrisy”.
    Whilst I accept that “kill us off” was perhaps a flippant phrase, I did not make any specific reference to the IRA, nor did I say that the “IRA attacks were designed to kill off British people”.
    Consequently, your remarks about my apparent lack of understanding concerning a problem with which, unfortunately, I am very familiar, in addition to your reference regarding Sun journalism were, I thought unwarranted.
    I also feel your later remark, “…and, I’m bound to remind you, the British army.” falls into the same category. My cousin, to whom I refer above, was a serving member of that army.

  38.  

    If you think that keeping the record straight is a sign of defensiveness, fair enough. I can’t change that, but the violence didn’t just spring out of thin air. It was a direct result of the political structure and systems in Northern Ireland.

    I’d also like to point out that nobody has a monopoly on the suffering that came from the conflict. The Dublin and Monaghan bombings killed 33 people and we have never found out the truth behind that mass murder. The British army shot dead 13 unarmed men and boys during a demonstration in Derry.

    None of this is to justify murder, but to remind people that there were many facets to the violence.

    Furthermore, this country was impeded socially and economically for decades as a result of what was taking place, and it was only when everyone accepted their share of responsibility that progress was made towards resolving the problem.

    In my opinion, there has been too much denial on all sides, and that’s why it’s important to do a reality check now and then.

    As for McFeely, as far as I can establish from reading his history, he was, and remains, a complete thug as well as a hypocrite.

  39.  

    Sorry, let’s get this straight.
    You implied that it was I that derailed your topic. I did not, you did, and that is what I was referring to in my last post.To repeat, ad nauseam, I merely referred to McFeeley’s “hypocrisy” in attempting to rejoin a section of society he had previously rebuffed in the most violent manner possible. I had absolutely no intention of introducing a discussion about the Provos or, for that matter, any other subject and yet, without knowing anything about me, you appear intent on lecturing me about Irish political history. THAT is why I made the remark about your seeming defensiveness. I did not derail the subject-you did.
    Thank you.

  40.  

    Oh dear Jesus. What did I draw on myself?

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