Fifty Shades of Property Tax Grey (well, brown)

So the revenue have produced a heatmap of the country, at DED level, to give you a guide as to the property tax you will pay. Or, not.

Its fifty shades of brown …well, seven anyhow. Take a look at Kerry and Kildare (yes, yes, I have two houses…one in Kildare where I live, and the other the old family home in Kerry) Anyone want to tell me that this is clear? Why not seven distinct shades?  Yes, one can increase the contrast but then if its too high and one is on the border of two bands you cant see….

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Contrast this dog’s breakfast with some of the work by AIRO and we see night and day.

I’m going to send a copy of The Visual Display of Quantitative Information  by  Edward Tufte, the best book ever on graphics, to the revenue for Easte   Maybe the Troika have insisted we sell off all our colours or something.

 

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Also posted on Brian’s blog, here.

7 thoughts on “Fifty Shades of Property Tax Grey (well, brown)

  1. They can make all the nice maps they like I will walk away from my house and job before i pay them 1 cent. Lets see how they put a detachment of earnings on nothing.

  2. Bock, I’m a designer and spent many years as a cartographer. Using colour and shading to differentiate anything from elevation to population density, to temperature or rainfall is commonplace.

    One thing I learned very early on was NEVER to use differing shades of the SAME colour where there were more than about three or four different gradients in play.

    In this case, the obvious choice would be to choose a colour range combined with different shades of each colour. As simple example would be where you start at the lower end with say, very pale green followed by a slightly darker green. Then shift the hue to a more orange colour and a slightly darker orange and so on to red and purple. This ‘colour wheel’ technique is universally accepted.

    Forget about sending Tufte’s book to them, it would only confuse the clowns that came up with the design.

  3. Boss,
    Dogs, Mallets, I hate to keep replaying this statement but again we have another prime example of how not to do something by a department that will be under the public scrutiny for the next few months. I despair, its an overlay on a map, you need distinct differences in a bloody overlay. Will this public service EVER learn?

    7 bands, 7 colours. Rainbow anyone? Add white and you can skip indigo and make the change from/between blue to violet to be sure to be sure..

    God help anyone with a hint of colour blindness trying to discern the shading differences in that yoke above.

  4. It ain’t a simple as using all the colours of the rainbow Geek, we left such simplistic graphical solutions back in the psychedelic ’60s. The trick is to combine a portion of the rainbow (e.g between green to red with shading of each) to achieve a visually pleasing, and useful result. Think temperature gradients on maps that range between navy (extreme cold) to yellow/orange (warm/hot). Turquoise and green being intermediates. I managed a map that way with 25 gradients across that part of the spectrum with no interpretation difficulties at all. We are only dealing with seven here for fuck sake.

    Trust me Geek, I’ve been here many times…

  5. It ain’t a simple as using all the colours of the rainbow Geek, we left such simplistic graphical solutions back in the psychedelic ’60s. The trick is to combine a portion of the rainbow (e.g between green to red with shading of each) to achieve a visually pleasing, and useful result. Think temperature gradients on maps that range between navy (extreme cold) to yellow/orange (warm/hot). Turquoise, forest green and acid green being intermediates. I managed a map that way with 25 gradients across that part of the spectrum with no interpretation difficulties at all. We are only dealing with seven here for fuck sake.

    Trust me Geek, I’ve been here many times…

  6. The contrast in the colour scheme used to highlight your tax band is terrible, yes. But in fairness, this is not the instrument with which you use to determine your houses value. You zoom into your house and click on it in the map, (after a short survey) and your value is clearly displayed in a prominant pop up. I think the colour scheme is actually incidental.

    To me the bigger issue is why they didnt use Google Maps. There is an interface that most internet savy people would be very used to using, They could have put their redundant colour scheme overlays on top no problem. I actually found the type on the maps that they used to be unclear. The tax band colour scheme, however, didnt really play a part.

  7. I would say that they have used the ordnance survey Ireland map after looking at the graphics of the houses

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