Annoying Shop Behaviour

My old mouse was knackered so I bought one in Maplins, but when I tried it out, the laser didn’t work.  It wouldn’t move the little pointer thing on the screen.

Luckily — and this is unusual for me — I still had the receipt in my pocket, so I took it back to them.

This mouse doesn’t work.  This mouse is deceased.  This is an ex-mouse.

In fairness to the girl who served me, there was no problem.  Just go down to the shelf and see if there’s something else that might suit you.

There wasn’t.  I’m not going to spend €45 on a goddamn mouse.

Apart from a brief period of officious bossiness where she went to check that I wasn’t a complete idiot, blind and senile, the girl was efficient, and went through the process as per training.  For some reason, they can’t just give you your money back.  If you paid for it by card, they have to put it back on your card, but I let that little moment pass by.  Why argue?

It wasn’t until she said, We’ll need your address that I baulked.

Why do you need my address?  Why do you need any personal details?

It’s for the refund.

I don’t care.  I’m not giving you any personal details.  Please return my money.

You have to give your address.

I do not.  Give me my money now, please.

You have to.

I don’t.  This is a data protection issue.  I never give shops my private details.  You’re not entitled to have this information.

After a moment or two eyeballing each other, she typed something (probably, This lunatic lives on Planet Pancake)  and I got my refund.  To be fair, I don’t blame the poor girl on the shop floor.  This shit is laid down by the goons in Head Office who treat privacy as something to be laughed at.

Don’t ever give a shop your private information when you buy something.  It’s none of their business.

PS, I went next door to Argos and got a better mouse for half the price.

 

16 thoughts on “Annoying Shop Behaviour

  1. Fair play Bock. Had similar experience with a jewellers in town who took a ‘contact phone number’ for a refund on a ring that was incorrectly sized. Few days later, started getting text messages about their special offers. Wasn’t long citing the old Data Protection, and telling them to delete my contact details from their computer.

    If people stop putting up with this rubbish, they’ll stop doing it. Money talks…

  2. Maplins have been getting away with that shit for years.
    A few months back I observed a customer giving his personal information at the till just to get what he was paying for.
    Idiot didn’t even notice what had just been done to him so it doesn’t surprise me that they’re still at it.

  3. There are some interesting characters in Maplins. Some have PhDs in electronics, but they don’t know Ohm’s law, can’t read the colour codes of resistors, etc. Amazing characters.
    They tried the address thing with me when I bought a lot of stuff that, potentially, could be used for timers and detonators. I explained that it was for a student project. Eventually, they agreed to hand me the stuff. I wonder what address that put on their database….

  4. Having worked in Maplins for manys a year, the reason they take the address for a refund(like many businesses now) is for audit reasons in case they think there’s ever anything fishy going on with the returns as there is huge room for internal fraud here. Having your contact details means they may be able to get a hold of you to confirm that you did indeed refund a purchase on such and such a date.

    Having said that, though you absolutely DO NOT have to give them over, the cashier simply needs to type ‘customer refused’ in the details section. Any pressing on this matter is an definite no-no and you were absolutely right to tell her where to go when she pushed the matter…

    @Mutant Zebra PHD’s? Not knowing resistor codes? Um, you realise these people are poor schmucks getting minimum wage? If you wish to speak to an electrical engineer or a sparks I’m sure you’ll find one in the yellow pages willing to donate his time for anything in the region of 50 – 100euro an hour.

  5. ” the reason they take the address for a refund(like many businesses now) is for audit reasons in case they think there’s ever anything fishy going on with the returns as there is huge room for internal fraud here”

    How so? You have to provide a receipt to get your money back. The auditor will see a Journal entry in the system detailing + 9.99 or whatever and reconcile with a -9.99 later on. There has to be a backed-out transaction with the payment provider and it can only go against the original transaction# and card. Everything just gets reset to 0. How can you game this zero-sum system apart from actually not taking the physical goods back off of an accomplice for example, in which case you have left MORE of a trail of evidence than if you had just let him in to nab it off the shelf….

    Management tells people these outright lies in order to make them believe that they should hand over their addresses like the good little citizens they are…in the case of legal proceedings the name and address of the cardholder will be made available from their bank who will be a party to the case.

    Incidentally, I would expect a member of staff in a store whose primary purpose is supposedly to sell electronic components, to be able to actually identify the parameters of said components, regardless of their salary. Not saying it’s the staff’s fault that they can’t, but I would expect the company to provide training…

  6. I would have thought a fairly basic requirement in a shop selling electronic components would be the ability to tell one resistor from another. So maybe Steve is 90% on the ball.

  7. But I said: “I would expect a member of staff in a store whose primary purpose is supposedly to sell electronic components, to be able to actually identify the parameters of said components” – which is the same as you said except in a much more convoluted fashion. So can I have my 10% back ;)

  8. “Incidentally, I would expect a member of staff in a store whose primary purpose is supposedly to sell electronic components, to be able to actually identify the parameters of said components, regardless of their salary. Not saying it’s the staff’s fault that they can’t, but I would expect the company to provide training.”

    Steve these people on minimum wage in these kind of stores are there to tell you how to work these machines not how they do what they do, if you get the difference.

  9. I take it back, I don’t know the store but if that is what they sell then I can’t see the flaw in Steve’s argument.

  10. I do know of a very prominent store in some town that was ripped off for thousands, all it took was one manager to refund a friend without a reciept,

    They got away with it for 2 years due to the high level of sales in that particular store

    It was the store staff that copped it in the end and not the accountants

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