Mulligatawny Recipe

 Posted by on August 31, 2014  Add comments
Aug 312014
 

I bumped into a friend today who shares my interest in cooking.  He’s an excellent cook, much better than I am, but today he was looking a bit under the weather.  We’ll call him “John”.

Are you a bit under the weather, John? I asked him.

Jesus, I am, he croaked.  I was out till four in the morning, but I’m much better now.

Glad to hear it, I assured him as the conversation drifted around to other matters.

Do you know what I made last week? he said.

No, John.   How would I know what you made last week?   I don’t even know what you made yesterday.

Well, he perked up, as it happens, I made bacon and cabbage yesterday for the very first time in my life.

Comfort food, I observed.

Mmm-hmm, agreed the obscure hungover-looking character in the corner.

Not something I’m particularly fond of.

Mulligatawny recipeMe neither, said “John”, I just got a figary to do it, but anyway, last week I made kedgeree.

Kedgeree?  I was taken aback.   How very Raj of you.  But as it happens, I’ve found smoked fish to be a wonderful cure for hangovers.  There was a time, many years ago when we used to have all-night house-parties, and I always found that the perfect breakfast was a kipper and a bottle of Guinness.

Precisely, agreed “John”.  That kedgeree knocked my hangover for six, old chap, and then I bagged an elephant.  Kedgeree for tiffin.  Can’t beat it, old boy.

You’ve got me thinking, I told him.  Here’s a thing I haven’t had in yonks.  Mulligatawny.  I first had it in an East End restaurant run by a Bangladeshi wallah years and years back, and damn tasty it was too.   Maybe I’ll revive the old Bock recipe series and see how it goes.

Splendid! said “John”, brandishing a buffalo gun.  Tally-ho!

_____________________

So here we go.

My ad-hoc Mulligatawny based on whatever I happened to have in the kitchen.

Now, here’s the thing about most recipes: you really can’t go wrong even if you don’t have all the stuff  because there’s no such thing as right and wrong ingredients.  In my case, the first Mulligatawny I ever had, back in the East End of London, had a strong lemon character to it and that’s what I continued to expect over the years, but another man’s recipe might be completely different and that’s fine too.  We make it up as we go along, based on what we have.

For this, you’ll need some spices.  Cumin seed, haldi, cracked peppercorns and plain old curry powder.  I prefer hot but you might like it milder.  That’s fine. It’s up to you.  As a matter of fact, I might even toss in a load of hot chilli as well just to liven it up, but that’s me.  Live and let live.

Mulligatawny recipe 003

The next thing you’ll need is some onions, some carrots and a few garlic cloves.

Mulligatawny recipe 005

 

Mulligatawny recipe 006

 

Mulligatawny recipe 004

Now.  When you have these all chopped up, you should fry them in clarified butter, although to be honest, unclarified butter is fine too as long as you don’t make it too hot and burn it.

Mulligatawny recipe 007

Fry them away gently until they’re soft, and at the same time, put on a pot of rice.  I prefer brown, but white is fine.  When we’re finished, we’ll mix the rice in with the sauce (or we might not, as I’ll explain in a little while).

When the onions, carrots and garlic are soft, you should toss in your spices and some flour to thicken things up.  Stir the whole lot around to get it well mixed.

Mulligatawny recipe 010

Mulligatawny recipe 011

Now add some chicken stock and cook it all up until it thickens.  Let it cook away for a good while.

Mulligatawny recipe 013

Now you can chop up your chicken and cook it in some clarified butter.

Mulligatawny recipe 009

When you think the sauce is well cooked, throw in some natural yoghurt.  Some people use coconut milk, but I haven’t tried that so I don’t know what it would taste like.  I must  try it next time.  Other people throw in a couple of chopped Granny Smith apples, which sounds interesting.  Nothing like a bit of variety.

Mulligatawny recipe 014

Then add the chicken and the juice of half a lemon.  Maybe you’d prefer it to be a bit tangier but you can always add the other half if it’s not to your taste.  There are no hard and fast rules in this.

Mulligatawny recipe 015

Now.

Let this cook away for a while.   Go off and shoot an elephant, but don’t forget to drain the rice first.

When you get back, it will all be ready and you can serve it, but here’s where you have to make a decision.  Traditionally, Mulligatawny has the rice mixed into the entire dish, but these days not everybody wants to eat rice.

You could serve it mixed like this.

Mulligatawny recipe 001

But I think it would be better to offer it in two separate bowls, and let people decide for themselves how much rice they want mixed in with the sauce.  It’s only fair, really.

Mulligatawny recipe 002

Three other things.

First, you can always add more spice or other flavours later.  Play around with the proportions.  Nobody will arrest you for getting it wrong.

Second.  Before adding the chicken you could, if you wished, blend the whole lot to a smooth consistency, and that’s what I myself intended to do, but I forgot.

Third, you don’t need to add meat.  This would make a very tasty vegetarian dish if you substituted sweet potato or butternut squash, for instance.

Anyway.  Enjoy your Mulligatawny and let me know how you get on.

  17 Responses to “Mulligatawny Recipe”

Comments (17)
  1.  

    Sounds interesting. I shall give it a try, Bock. Thank you.
    As you like it hot: Did you ever give harissa a try?

  2.  

    I must confess, I have not.

  3.  

    Ah, I only tried it for the first time a couple of months ago, myself. It’s pretty hot, giving meals a fine note, if you don’t take too much.
    Re your Mulligatawny Recipe: I shall let you know how I got on.

  4.  

    love mulligatawny, and also your blog. cheers bock!

  5.  

    Never heard of mulligatawny before. I think I’ll try that with yesterday’s left over chicken, it looks simple and of course, sometimes the simpler the better.
    Thanks for that!

  6.  

    Sean, I’m a big fan of harissa. The best one , in my humble opinion, is available from the olive stall / shop in the Milk Market. Great with lamb and stirred into curries, chillie, tagines etc.

  7.  

    @No 8: I second that. It’s really good from that shop. If anyone cares to throw up a recipe for it here, I’d be all ears (eyes?)

  8.  

    Ha, No.8 and Steve, you can’t, of course, know how cruel you are by recommending this very shop in the Milk Market.
    See, for me living in Lower Saxony the way to Limerick is even longer than the way to Tipperary. :)

    And here the first recipe the search engine offered.
    The peace of the night.

  9.  

    I’ll definitely give this a go soon.

    I’ve noticed a lot of chefs don’t bother blending up soups either.
    I find the consistency like baby food when it’s blended.
    Here’s a nice recipe for roasted tomato soup that I make a lot, where the tomatoes are left mulchy.
    She uses a food mill, but you could use a hand blender for a couple of seconds.
    http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ina-garten/roasted-tomato-basil-soup-recipe.html

    Also, you are better off using the natural yogurt.
    There’s about 25 grams of fat/300 cals in a can of coconut milk.

  10.  

    Tried this last week , never did before mainly ‘cos of the name ,..used Lime , mixed indian spice seed stuff from proper Indian shop , turmeric and rest pretty much same…….1 x bucket load later I was most impressed and ate all week…ta one of ur best methinx Mr Bock …nice one .

  11.  

    oh and ya….natural Yog…cheers Artemis I forgot that bit

  12.  

    No bother Brian.
    Only mentioned it as Bock used it.
    Cocomilk is nice. I make a nice Thai Chilli Chicken dish with it, but the low fat natural yogurt is a tad on the healthier side.
    Great you can get all those ingredients in, eh.. Canada wasn’t it? :)

  13.  

    Brian…bzzzt good guess though , yogurts the go eh ‘cept for the Thai dishes and t’is far from Canada I am….cheers

  14.  

    Ah damn it. I’m usually right.
    I’m sure you said Canada before.
    Must be the U.S. then.
    Nevermind. I’m going senile in my auld age.

    B for Bzzzt. Nice onomatopoeic name that. :)

    Yes, yogurt, the natural kind, unless you don’t mind the extra cals.

  15.  

    Wrong hemisphere and an advantage of a diverse multicultural society, which works rather well for the most part , is browsing these little independent type shops on a wet day , theirs something I thought I’d never be doing ha…senile too p’raps or maybe just sad . I need the cals so full bore Yog for me , deffo gonna make this again though it was yum. Onomatopoeic eh , ta for that had to google but hey I learnt something new….always a good day that ta Artemis .

  16.  

    Great recipe,

    Mulligatawny is basically a south indian dish.

  17.  

    Great research. You must be a journalist.

Leave a Reply