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Economy Favourites Religion

Religious Orders Not So Different from Bankers

The Magdalene survivors are to be paid something by the State to compensate them for their time imprisoned and enslaved by the religious orders.  This is only right and proper, although not everyone agrees that the amount offered is fair.  Some survivor groups have accepted the offer and others have rejected it, but at least it’s an offer on the table, with a scale of compensation set out clearly, based on the period of incarceration.

And yet, it’s hard not to ignore the strange parallel between the attitudes of the religious orders and the behaviour of the clowns in Anglo-Irish bank

Anyone who followed the appalling meat grinder that was the Residential Institutions Redress Board will be relieved.  Nobody – especially not a person rendered vulnerable and inarticulate by abuse – should have to appear before a board of stern examiners, as happened with the RIRB.  The examination process was cold, analytical, inquisitorial and deeply intimidating to people who had, at best, a limited education.  For many, it compounded the suffering inflicted in the industrial schools.  As if that wasn’t enough, even though the survivors were represented legally at public expense, many lawyers subsequently hit them with additional legal bills despite having been paid already.

The offer applies to about 600 women and the scale of payment ranges from €11,500 for people incarcerated for three months to €20,500 for one year, €68,500 for five years to a maximum of €100,000 for anyone imprisoned for ten years or more.  I hope this is a sliding scale and not a stepped scale, to avoid bureaucratic injustices where a woman locked up for nine years and eleven months is denied the full payment.  This is not a vague remote possibility.  This kind of thing happens all the time due to the narrow vision of the typical Irish administrator.

Of course, as is normal, the religious orders are complaining about being asked to pay their share, just as they did when asked to pay a minuscule proportion of the compensation arising from the Ryan report.  Of the €1.4 billion final outcome, the taxpayer has so far carried almost the entire cost.  In their own defence, the nuns are saying that they still pay for 100 women in their care.  Or to put it another way, they continue to feed their slaves in old age, which is very Christian indeed.  It will be very surprising if they contribute a penny to the State’s costs, because these are not people who believe in contributing.

It’s only right that the Magdalene women should be offered full health care and a minimum weekly income before reaching pension age, but yet, here we go again.  The State is carrying the full cost — and here, I should point out that the amount is trivial compared to the scale of the scam inflicted on us by the Anglo spivs.  The total lump-sum cost of compensating the Magdalene survivors will come to about €30 million.  Even if we included the €1.4 billion spent on the redress board, the total comes to a figure less than one twentieth of the hardship inflicted on the citizens by Anglo and Irish Nationwide.

So let’s get things in context, and let’s also remember that these women are far more deserving of compensation than the bondholders of failed banks who couldn’t believe their luck when Lenihan announced his ill-conceived bailout of gamblers and hedge funds.

The bankers, the priests and the nuns, behind all the superficial differences, share a similar mindset.  They share a belief that the Irish State owes them something.  They share a belief that they are above the civil law, and most of all, they share a belief, which was subsequently shown to be correct, they they would never have to pay anything back.   And let’s not forget that the bankers formed a sort of priestly brotherhood whose expertise, we now know, was not based on any kind of scientifically-confirmed knowledge, but, in their own words, picked out of their arses.  Much like religion, in other words.

For different, and yet strangely similar reasons, the State found it necessary to step in and cover the damage caused by these two very different, and yet very similar,  societal groups.  It’s no accident that bankers and priests were on the list of people of impeccable probity who could sign an official document on your behalf.   How times change.

There’s no escaping the question: do we Irish have a disastrous failing that leads us to believe every chancer, wide-boy and bunco-artist who sets himself up as an authority in some fake doctrine, whether it happens to be religion or banking?

And as a corollary, why don’t we as a nation force the perpetrators to carry the consequences of their actions?   There are very few clerics in jail and even fewer bankers.

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Full text of report here:

Download (PDF, 1.17MB)

 

 

 

 

Categories
Crime Religion Society

Enda Kenny Apologises to Magdalene Victims

It’s good that Enda Kenny has apologised to the Magdalene slaves on behalf of the State, but isn’t something missing?

Where is the apology from the nuns who ran these slave labour camps?  Where is the apology from the NSPCC (now the ISPCC), employers of the feared and unsupervised  cruelty men who consigned so many children and young women to this slavery and to abuse in industrial schools?  Where is the apology from the Legion of Mary, whose members — almost unbelievably — served as unofficial probation officers, facilitating the incarceration of people they disapproved of?  Where is the apology from the Roman Catholic church on behalf of all those parish priests who ripped children from the heart of their families because of some warped and perverted view of sexuality?

I haven’t seen or heard any apology from any of these groupings.

What an extraordinary society it was that deputised an assortment of self-serving busybodies to act on its behalf.  What a strange country that gave (and continues to give) such power to clerics and self-appointed meddlers.

magdalene laundries

It has been said that many of the cruelty men lived a more affluent life than their salaries might indicate, and there is no doubt that every Magdalene slave and industrial school slave was a money-making asset for the religious orders, no matter what their account ledgers might indicate today.  Any business with unlimited access to free labour is doing well.  The nuns and the brothers had unlimited access to such a pool of labour, and it has been said that some cruelty men benefited financially from their gratitude.  It has even been suggested that there was a bounty on a child’s head, which might account for the arrest and conviction of children for robbing an orchard, for missing school, or in the case of young girls, for being a little too pretty.

Now, nobody can doubt that Enda Kenny was sincere in his apology to the Magdalene slaves.  Even though I don’t subscribe to his political outlook, Enda is the ultimate boring embodiment of unimaginative middle-Ireland, and he is a decent man.  But as I said already, that apology is partial at best, given the absence of contrition from all the others complicit in the abuse and incarceration of these women.

The last time a government set up a mechanism for restitution and redress, it was deeply flawed.  The Residential Institutions Redress Board was an intimidating and cold experience for those who came before it and the process provided yet another opportunity for legal firms to make money at the expense not only of the State, but of the victims themselves, through double billing.

Besides that, the abusive religious orders paid little or nothing towards the cost.  Instead, they denied and obfuscated right up to the end and have never shown the slightest genuine remorse for their actions.

The priority must be to support and protect victims of the Magdalene laundries.  Let the State look after them without question, and then, if necessary, let us change our law to limit property rights, just as we did only last week in passing the Anglo legislation.  Let us judge how much the religious orders should contribute to the cost and let us take this money from them whether they like it or not, just as we should have done after the Ryan Report.

Just as this state has always failed to do.

 

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Previously:

Magdalene laundries and the power of shame

Ryan Report

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Child abuse commission

 

Categories
Favourites Religion

The Power of Shame

What’s the most powerful human emotion?

You might say fear, since it’s the primal impulse to survive, but you’d be wrong.  You might say anger.  Bah.  That hardly counts as an emotion at all.  Even insects get angry.  Romantics will of course say love, while cynics will say greed, but it’s none of the above.  The most powerful, overwhelming, all-dominating human emotion is shame.  Salman Rushdie set out this concept in his novel of the same name, describing how an entire nation, its people and its beliefs could be defined by shame, and what holds true for a vast population like Pakistan is equally valid for a tiny bunch of disordered famine-survivors like the Irish.

Magdalene graves, Limerick

You think I joke?  You think it’s stretching it a bit to describe us as famine survivors, with our well-fed bellies and our ostentatious  double-breasted houses (even if we are a bit down on our luck these days)?

Think again.  The Irish famine is but a blink away in history and it shaped every last thing about who we are today.  There are few degrees of separation: my grandfather knew many people who lived through the famine.  They swaddled him as a baby and perhaps they bounced him on their bony old knees.  They told him stories in his cot, but one tale they never told was how they survived when so many did not.  This was not a narrative to be passed down the generations, because it carried not one, but two great shames embedded in its broken heart.

The first was the shame of survival and the second was the shame of oppression.

The first gnaws at the soul and uses a different name when it walks out in the daylight.  That name is Guilt.

The second one chews away at the very fabric of our being, because now we know what it is to be nothing.  Now we know what the boot feels like against our neck as we lie in the mud, and we spend the rest of our time on earth in a ceaseless effort to become something again.  The best of us succeed by letting go of the pain, the humiliation, the shame,  finding a place inside themselves where they can live at peace.

Most of us are not that wise and so we live out our days balancing one silence against another, relieved and enraged, angry towards those who shared our pain as much as those who inflicted it, and determined never again to speak of what we know.

A few on the dark side understand the true nature of shame and know even better its antidote: contempt.  Here’s the paradox for them: there is only one path away from shame but it’s both true and false at the same time.  You will no longer feel shame if you stumble on the secret of not feeling anything.  Yet you can do better than this.  If you can feel superior to someone, if you can feel true contempt for some poor wretch, then you are no longer at the very bottom of the shame hierarchy.  You are now one step up.

It was no accident that the old people used to describe certain characters as three ha’pence looking down on a penny.   That’s human nature the world over, but let’s look at Ireland in the mid-nineteenth century.

Crushed.  Demoralised.  Three to four million native Irish speakers removed at a stroke.  Its culture eviscerated by emigration, starvation and disease, thanks to a government in London that believed in tooth-and-claw laissez faire economics.  A government whose only interest was the wealthy merchant classes, and the devil take the hindmost.

In the words of Francis Spaight, a Limerick businessman whose shops continued in business until the 1980s,

I found so great an advantage of getting rid of the pauper population upon my own property that I made every possible exertion to remove them … I consider the failure of the potato crop to be the greatest possible value in one respect in enabling us to carry out the emigration system

We made the mistake of thinking the policy was anti-Irish when it was simply anti-poor, and by making that mistake, we lost the opportunity to throw off the shame of oppression.  Instead, we immersed ourselves in a ferment of resentment when we needed constructive anger and thus we developed our most outstanding national characteristics, self pity and infantilism.

cardinal paul cullenThis Ireland of shame, humiliation, confusion and bad self-esteem was perfect for the arrival of a man like Paul Cullen, Ireland’s first cardinal, who landed in 1850, in all his pomp and importance, while people still starved by the roadside and evictions were rampant as landlords exploited the opportunity to clear their lands of the poor, so that they could consolidate the holdings into the hands of strong Irish farmers willing to breed livestock instead of cultivating grain.  Beef for Britain.

Cullen understood well his status as a prince of the Church and he wasted no time reminding the locals of his power.  The Synod of Thurles attracted thousands from all over the land, by train, by cart, mounted and on foot.  The gentry, of course, commandeered the upper windows to view the procession of clerics in all their glory, an incongruous spectacle at a time when thousands were still dying of starvation  in ditches or of typhoid on trans-Atlantic coffin ships.

These men of Christ were not men of Charity.  Their god was power and Cullen intended to impose it at every opportunity.  The pre-Famine hedonism of the Irish was to be replaced by a rigid ultramontane clericalism with Cullen at its head.  In future, if anyone thought of dancing, there would be a stern young priest standing by to make sure they kept their arms by their side.

Over the next twenty years, Cullen devised every manner of religious trick.  He invented Benediction and the First Fridays.  He insisted that priests should be called Father, not Mister.  He established and supported religious orders throughout the country, populated by young men and women imbued with his new religious fervour.

If anyone didn’t know shame before Cullen arrived, they knew it now, for he brought a new flavour of shame to a people replete with the first two kinds.  Cullen taught the Irish to be ashamed of sex.  To be ashamed of themselves and everything that made them an individual.  As if things weren’t bad enough, Cardinal Paul Cullen made an entire country mentally ill.

Cullen taught the Irish people self-hatred, while at the same time elevating the vanguard of contempt to the centre of influence with the support and approval of the London government.  Whatever kept the people passive suited their agenda.  The Magdalene asylums thrived under Cullen’s reign, as the various orders of nuns blossomed and the Irish sense of self-worth declined, to be replaced by a rigidly-applied set of Catholic rules, based on a hatred of sex.

It’s no surprise that Cullen was so successful in his efforts to establish clericalism in Ireland after the Famine.  He provided a means of sublimation and he also provided a displacement activity to a nation so baffled by its own subjugation and so horrified at what neighbour had done to neighbour, that nobody had either answers or even words to explain.

Instead of thinking clearly about the horrors that had occurred in living memory, our forebears now had the easy escape route into unthinking piety, the option of religious mantras like the Rosary instead of difficult choices like confronting what had happened.

It was a false route out of our collective shame, but it was seductive and it worked.

For those who needed the vindictive solution, the Magdalene Laundries provided the answer, because here was a repository of human beings  who had been dehumanised and who were easy to feel contempt for.  Shame had its antidote in these places for anyone with a craving to feel contempt, as most of these nuns did.

As a child, I never understood why my mother disliked nuns so much.  I didn’t know what she meant when she used the word frustrated to describe them, but of course I see it clearly now and at the same time I feel less inclined to judge.  Yes, it’s true that the nuns were emotionally cruel.  It’s true that they humiliated and dominated their prisoners, but then you have to ask the overwhelming question: what were their stories?

Taken at the age of twelve or thirteen, before puberty, soaked in Cullen’s Catholic ideology, infused with a puritanical loathing of the body and driven mad by the requirement to suppress their own desires as they grew into maturity, is it conceivable that some of them would not have become bitter, twisted and cruel?

What is a Magdalene laundry if not a place where an emotionally-damaged nation can put all its shame and forget about it?

The story of the Magdalenes is the story of Ireland from the 1850s to the present day and if we approach it properly, it offers us the therapeutic opportunity to really look at ourselves and see what made us who we are.  If we use that opportunity well, we might even be able to work out how to escape the evil inflicted by Cullen and go back to the sort of people we used to be.  The people we pretend to be in all our tourist literature.

 

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Previously

The Magdalene Laundries Scandal

The Magdalene Laundries

Government Statement on Magdalene Laundries

Silence from self-described pro-life groups about mass grave of 800 babies 

 

 

Categories
Crime

Magdalene Laundries Report To Be Published

UPDATE: Full report here.

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The report on the Magdalene Laundries is due to be published tomorrow and its terms of reference are extremely narrow: establish the extent of State involvement in these institutions.  It had no powers to call witnesses and no powers to demand documents.

Chaired by Senator Martin McAleese, the committee consists of representatives from a number of government departments:

  • Justice and Equality;
  • Health;
  • Environment, Community and Local Government;
  • Education and Skills;
  • Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation; and
  • Children & Youth Affairs.

Its terms of reference cover the following institutions where Catholic orders of nuns kept slaves throughout the 20th century.

Sisters of Our Lady of Charity
High Park, Drumcondra, Dublin;
Sean McDermott St/Gloucester Street, Dublin;

Congregation of the Sisters of Mercy
No. 47 Forster Street, Galway;
St Patrick’s Refuge, Crofton Road, Dun Laoghaire, Dublin;

Religious Sisters of Charity
Donnybrook, Dublin;
Peacock Lane, Cork;

Sisters of the Good Shepherd
Cork Road, Waterford;
New Ross, Wexford;
Pennywell Road, Limerick;
Sunday’s Well, Cork

Good Shepherd

Unfortunately, for reasons undisclosed, the government failed to include another slave-laundry in its remit to the inter-departmental committee, namely the Stanhope Street laundry in Dublin.  It appears that the Sisters of Charity got away with this because the laundry was officially designated as a training school even though its prisoners received no training and worked themselves to death in precisely the same way as those locked up in the other slave factories.

Even more unfortunately, the investigating committee is non-statutory.  It has no powers to compel witnesses or even to demand records and is therefore at the mercy, so to speak, of the religious orders who have a vested interest in hiding the truth about the crimes their members committed against Irish women through the decades.  In this regard, the orders have found the Data Protection Act to be a great protection.

Consequently, given the fight that the religious orders put up against the Commission to Inquire into Child Abuse, which did have statutory powers, it’s hard to see how Martin McAleese will be able to produce a report with any meaning.  If the government had been serious about the Magdalene scandal, it would have commissioned an inquiry with real teeth, but instead it ran scared when it saw what the Residential Institutions Redress Board cost in compensation — all of it picked up by the State and not by the perpetrators.

Given its initial statement on the matter, it’s hard to avoid the conclusion that the government deliberately hobbled the committee in order to make sure that these women, whose lives were destroyed by slavery, will never have a claim against the State or against the religious orders who used and abused them.

On the other hand, Martin McAleese is a decent man and I suppose we can hope that under his chairmanship the committee will be able to expose what took place in these dreadful prisons, but that’s unlikely since the terms of reference are so narrow.

We can hope, but we shouldn’t hold our breath.

 

Magdalenes

Interim Report

Download (PDF, 242KB)

 

 

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Previously

Government Statement on the Magdalene Laundries.

The Magdalene Laundries

 

Categories
Favourites Health Politics Religion

Ireland. No Country For Young Women.

Who remembers the dismissive words of Robert Kilroy-Silk ten years ago when he described Ireland as a country peopled by peasants, priests and pixies?

I recall it vividly, like a sharp slap in the face.  I thought he was the most despicable individual I had ever come across, and in many ways, I still do, but even a reptile like Kilroy can sometimes hit the mark, as our national behaviour continues to reveal.

As I write, and even while the country is still convulsed by the shock of Savita Halappanavar’s death in a Galway hospital, the heartless stormtroopers of ideology are on the march to shout down our misgivings.  The representatives of far-right Catholic groupings  are given equal air space with elected representatives because, simply, they demand it.

Right now, as I type this, a young woman on the radio describes how a hospital refused to induce delivery even though they knew that her child was anencephalic.  The young mother was instructed that, because there was a foetal heartbeat, they could not and would not deliver the baby, even though it had no hope of life.   It doesn’t matter to our authorities that a baby with such a neural tube defect has virtually no brain, or that the heartbeat is there simply because the mother is acting as a life-support machine.  If you happen to be an expectant mother who receives such tragic news, you will receive no sympathy in an Irish hospital.  You will be told to carry on with the pregnancy for three, four or five months, knowing that at the end you will deliver a dead infant.

You are a machine, not a person.

That’s the Ireland that claims to espouse Christian, loving values.  That’s the behaviour demanded by machines of a different kind — pro-Life hobbyists on behalf of Youth Defence and the sinister Life Institute, both of which are largely the product of one single family of extreme-Right ideologues.

Let’s be afraid of these people.  They represent a very dangerous strain of Irish society.

Thanks to these people who display no human empathy, mothers are forced to carry dead babies to full term.  Mothers are forced to wait three or more days to miscarry and ultimately to die of infection as Savita Halappanavar did.

We need to start asking ourselves why we built a society based on the flawed, enraged, judgemental, dysfunctional attitudes spawned by a religious movement with its roots in a very dark Ireland.  The attitudes that drive Youth Defence and the Life Institute are identical to the unfeeling, callous outlook that consigned so many young girls as slaves in the Magdalene laundries.  These are the very same people who ranted about wife-swapping sodomites when Ireland passed a constitutional amendment permitting divorce.

If we really believe that we have a republic, the first thing we need to do is walk away from these people and what they represent.  There are many who hold sincere and deeply-felt views opposed to abortion, but neither Youth Defence nor the Life Institute are in that category.  These people are about control, not compassion.

Of course, even if we had the maturity to dismiss the lies, the propaganda and the intimidation, we would still be left with the spineless politicians who live in fear of our pernicious electoral system: the multi-seat constituency.  This is a system that encourages clientelism, corruption and cowardice, because it sets party colleagues at each other’s throats.  If your political enemy doesn’t beat you, your ally will knife you in the back.  And that’s why our politicians are so terrified to stand up on their hind legs when it comes to legislating for abortion as they were instructed to do twenty years ago by the Supreme Court.  If the average FG or FF politician sticks his head above the parapet, it will be chopped off by his party colleague, in the interest of political advantage.

That’s why the politicians would rather see a young mother die in agony, or be forced to carry a dead child for months, or else to skulk off to England like a criminal.

It’s better to maintain the delusion that this is somehow an advanced, forward-thinking European democracy, instead of the primitive, tribal, superstitious, third-world prison island it really is.  It’s easier to live in a fantasy than do anything about changing the reality.

This is no country for young women.

For that matter, this is no country for young men, or old men or old women or anyone else with the slightest sense of decency or intelligence.  This country is broken, and we’d be better off leaving it for the lunatics to finish out their miserable existence in solitude.

I’m finished with trying to defend this failed political experiment.

 

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Previously

No country for young women

Categories
Favourites Religion Society

Government Statement on Magdalene Laundries

The government has issued the following statement on the Magdalene Laundries.

The Government today considered the circumstances of the women and girls who resided in the Magdalene Laundries.  The Government welcomed the statement made last week by CORI on behalf of the four congregations, the Sisters of Our Lady of Charity, the Religious Sisters of Charity, the Sisters of Mercy and the Good Shepherd Sisters who indicated their “willingness” to “bring clarity, understanding, healing and justice in the interests of all the women involved”.  The Government believes it is essential to fully establish the true facts and circumstances relating to the Magdalene Laundries as a first step. The following has been agreed:

1. An Inter-departmental Committee will be established, chaired by an independent person, to clarify any State interaction with the Magdalene Laundries and to produce a narrative detailing such interaction.

2. The Minister for Justice, Equality and Defence, Alan Shatter TD and the Minister of State with responsibility for Disability, Equality, Mental Health and Older People, Kathleen Lynch TD are to meet with the religious congregations and the groups representing former residents of the Magdalene Laundries. Their discussions will include addressing the following matters;

a. The making available by the congregations of all records maintained by them with regard to the residents of the Magdalene Laundries to enable all available information about former residents to be shared with them and also made available for appropriate research purposes.

b. The provision of information concerning the number of persons currently residing with or in the care of the religious congregations who originally commenced such residence in the Magdalene Laundries  and who have remained in their care.

c. To discuss the putting in place of a restorative and reconciliation process and the structure that might be utilised to facilitate such process.

The Minister for Justice, Equality and Defence together with the Minister of State for Disability, Equality, Mental Health and Older People, will now be following up on this Government decision with the relevant parties. Consideration is being given to the appropriate independent person to appoint to chair the Inter-departmental Committee. It was agreed by government that an initial report should be made to Cabinet on the progress being made by the Inter-departmental Committee within 3 months of its
establishment.

This seems to be a very weak response from the minister, Alan Shatter, who in opposition spoke as follows on the Dáil record in 2009:

Does the Taoiseach intend to introduce legislation in the new year to amend the redress board legislation to extend it to those who suffered barbaric cruelty in the Magdalen laundries? The Department of Justice, Equality and Law Reform now has irrefutable evidence that this State and the courts colluded in sending young women to what were then known as the Magdalen asylums. They ended up in the Magdalen laundries and were treated appallingly. Some of them have never recovered from the manner in which they were treated and their lives have been permanently blighted. Initially in this House the Minister for Education and Science denied that the State had any involvement in this. There is now absolutely irrefutable evidence as a consequence of court records and files that have been examined in the Department of Justice, Equality and Law Reform that the State was directly complicit in many women being placed in these totally inappropriate circumstances.

 

To his credit, Fianna Fáil TD Tom Kitt concurred with Shatter as follows:

Professor James Smith from Boston came here on Tuesday and I facilitated a meeting with him of an all-party group of Oireachtas Members. He has presented very strong evidence that the young women were routinely referred to various Magdalen asylums via the Irish court system. The Garda actually returned women who escaped from these laundry institutions even though these women should have been perfectly free to leave. Professor Smith met officials from the Department of Justice, Equality and Law Reform and got a very positive response. On the basis of this new evidence I ask the Taoiseach to look again at the need to address the case of the Magdalen laundries. The Government is following up on the recommendations of the Ryan report, but these people are being excluded. It is a matter of justice and principle.

Something seems to change in people when they assume ministerial office. I don’t know what the process is, but people seem to lose their humanity. I’m reminded of a similar instance as long ago as 1946. The famous Father Flanagan of Boystown visited Ireland and was appalled at the abuse inflicted on children locked up in religious-run institutions. When Justice Minister Gerry Boland was asked in the Dáil about Flanagan’s comments, he replied as follows:

I have a cutting from a paper which contains a statement to that effect. I was not disposed to take any notice of what Monsignor Flanagan said while he was in this country, because his statements were so exaggerated that I did not think people would attach any importance to them. When, however, on his return to America he continues to make use of statements of this kind, I feel it is time that somebody should reply … All I have got to say is that these schools are under the management of religious Orders, who are self-effacing people, and who do not require any commendation from me.

Thus spake Gerry Boland, the well-known patriot and republican.

It seems little has changed in 65 years. What happened to Alan Shatter’s former zeal for protecting human rights?  What exactly does this mean?

The Government welcomed the statement made last week by CORI on behalf of the four congregations, the Sisters of Our Lady of Charity, the Religious Sisters of Charity, the Sisters of Mercy and the Good Shepherd Sisters who indicated their “willingness” to “bring clarity, understanding, healing and justice in the interests of all the women involved”.

What about forcing them to cooperate whether they like it or not? Wouldn’t that be a mark of a mature democracy, given Shatter’s unequivocal question?

Does the Taoiseach intend to introduce legislation in the new year to amend the redress board legislation to extend it to those who suffered barbaric cruelty in the Magdalen laundries?

Barbaric cruelty, according to Shatter before he became a minister.

Let us hope that Shatter is a better man than Batt O Keeffe who, as minister for education, belittled the plight of the Magdalene slaves when he referred to them as employees.  This is despicable, but probably no more than one might expect from a minister of the worst government we have ever known.

I have always held considerable regard for Alan Shatter as a man and as a politician.  I still retain hope that he will show more respect for his fellow human beings.

Time will tell.

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See also Justice for the Magdalenes

Categories
Favourites Religion Society

Old Nuns in the Magdalene Convents

Where are you now, Amelia Van Nuvenhove, resident of a house 51.1 in Clare Street (Limerick No. 1 Urban)?  Where are you, now that almost two hundred years have passed since your birth in 1821, 20-odd years before our Famine?  Did you ever think you’d end up in Ireland, a 90-year-old nun, marital status single, children born NIL?

Amelia, did you ever daydream about some young man in your native Belgian land?  Someone called Jan or Dirk or Klaas?  How did you end up here, Amelia, imprisoning and torturing young Irish girls?  How on earth did you end up here doing that?

And now, there you are, ninety years old, and a man is at the door with a list.  He bears the authority of King George the Fifth, and he wants to know your age, your name, where you came from.

Amelia, you don’t care, but perhaps Bridget Haugh does.  Bridget was born in Limerick City and like you is listed as Head of the Community of the Good Shepherd.  She’s 63 and her signature is on the census return as head of the household.

 

 

Or maybe Margaret Cahill from Cork is at the front door speaking to the man with the King’s warrant.  Margaret is only 55, but also a Head of the Community of the Good Shepherd.  What does Margaret yearn to say to this man? It gets lonely here?

It’s unlikely that Ellen Grennan from the King’s County or Teresa Keegan from Dublin, both 79 and both Heads of the Community of the Good Shepherd, are lowering themselves to deal with this upstart, despite their relative youth.  Perhaps you and they occasionally share a quiet chat in the eventime?  And perhaps you’re joined by Anne O’Keeffe, a hearty 71-year-old Kerrywoman, or Bridget O’Meara from Limerick, who recently hit 73.

Look over there Amelia, at Julianna Reddick, now 65, who came from Dublin.  Julianna is thinking about old age, about never getting laid, about never having a family.  So are Bridget, Margaret, Ellen, Teresa and  Anne. So is Mary Curtayne, now 58, and so is Teresa Anne Raleigh who just hit 59.  Bessie Kennedy from Kerry is 61.  Johanna Delaney, from Tipperary is 64.  Nora Curtin,  57, is from Limerick and Margaret Lynskey from Galway is a youthful 55.

They’re all heads of the community, and, just like you, they don’t use their real names.  In front of the slaves, they’re called Mother Johanna, and Mother Margaret, though they have not a single maternal bone in their bodies that hasn’t been eaten up with resentment and frustration.  And all of them, including you, are thinking the very same thing.  What if I wasn’t a nun?

Guess what?

The whole lot of you are going to die wondering, and you know it, you spiteful crowd of old bitches.

And that’s why you inflict your hang-ups on the prisoners who did nothing whatever to deserve your attentions.

Here, in 1911, are your prisoners, and even though you died soon afterwards, your poisonous message lived on for almost a century.  So thanks, Amelia.   Thanks, Bridget. Thanks Ellen.  Thanks Teresa.

In the end, you are not the  abscess.  You are only the pus.

Take a bow, Cardinal Paul Cullen, for polluting Irish society to its core. More about you in due course.

_______

This census return of 1911 was made during the rule of Westminster.  Following independence, the numbers of slaves in the Good Shepherd prison increased greatly as the Irish Free State continued to cede power to the Catholic church.

 

_______

 

Let’s have a word for these poor devils in 1911 who slaved under Amelia, Bridget, Ellen, Teresa and the rest of the religious crew.  How happy the nuns must have been, in control of these helpless women and girls.  This is a further extract from the 1911 census.

 

Gillispie Kate 25 Female Roman Catholic
McNamara Anne 29 Female Roman Catholic
Doolan Anne 50 Female Roman Catholic
Farrell Rosanna 20 Female Roman Catholic
OConnor Mary 55 Female Roman Catholic
Mc Auliffe Maggie 25 Female Roman Catholic
Cournane Mary 32 Female Roman Catholic
Omara Mary 25 Female Roman Catholic
Neal Mary 30 Female Roman Catholic
Browne Ennly 37 Female Roman Catholic
Nearty Maggie 29 Female Roman Catholic
Kennedy Crissie 18 Female Roman Catholic
Conway Sarah 18 Female Roman Catholic
Murphy Nano 56 Female Roman Catholic
Tierney Catherine 35 Female Roman Catholic
ONeill Johanna 50 Female Roman Catholic
Boyd Agnes 19 Female Roman Catholic
Fennell Kate 28 Female Roman Catholic
Cahill Kate 21 Female Roman Catholic
Callaghan Bride 18 Female Roman Catholic
Ellis Norab 51 Female Roman Catholic
Luzzia Norab 45 Female Roman Catholic
Moore Mary 22 Female Roman Catholic
Martya Kate 17 Female Roman Catholic
Reddan Mary 50 Female Roman Catholic
Gallaher Norah 50 Female Roman Catholic
Mcamy Ellie 19 Female Roman Catholic
Roche Lizzie 29 Female Roman Catholic
Murphy Mary 18 Female Roman Catholic
Laughnane Mary 16 Female Roman Catholic
Richey Jannie 65 Female Roman Catholic
Harrington Julia 28 Female Roman Catholic
Webbe Mary 22 Female Roman Catholic
Slaymaker Ellie 42 Female Roman Catholic
Mulhall Maggie 18 Female Roman Catholic
Moloney Ellie 22 Female Roman Catholic
Molloy Mary 70 Female Roman Catholic
Sheehan Mary 45 Female Roman Catholic
Sheehy Catherine 56 Female Roman Catholic
OConnor Molly 40 Female Roman Catholic
Lowe Isabel 42 Female Roman Catholic
Quinlan Mary 73 Female Roman Catholic
Ryan Margaret 45 Female Roman Catholic
Brohan Annie 20 Female Roman Catholic
ODwyer Mary 24 Female Roman Catholic
OMoore Norah 65 Female Roman Catholic
Fitzgerald Jannie 48 Female Roman Catholic
Madigan Mary 49 Female Roman Catholic
Noonan Kate 50 Female Roman Catholic
Gleeson Grace 31 Female Roman Catholic
Geraghty Mary 44 Female Roman Catholic
Dunne Mary 48 Female Roman Catholic
OConnor Kate 48 Female Roman Catholic
Keogh Mary 41 Female Roman Catholic
Murray Mary 50 Female Roman Catholic
Mc Malon Annie 45 Female Roman Catholic
Mc Namara Mary 28 Female Roman Catholic
Sisk Mary 21 Female Roman Catholic
Cotter Sarah 50 Female Roman Catholic
Hoffman Delia 45 Female Roman Catholic
Reddan Mary 43 Female Roman Catholic
O Shaughnessy Josephine 20 Female Roman Catholic
Mc Donagh Winnie 47 Female Roman Catholic
Ratigan Bridget 20 Female Roman Catholic
Flanagan Maggie 17 Female Roman Catholic
ONeill Louisa 31 Female Roman Catholic
Dempsey Maggie 22 Female Roman Catholic
Dowe Mary 63 Female Roman Catholic
Rice Katie 22 Female Roman Catholic
Gallagher Nellie 18 Female Roman Catholic
Edwards Delia 33 Female Roman Catholic
Trennich Teresa 25 Female Roman Catholic
O Kieffe Ellie 70 Female Roman Catholic
Barrett Mary 35 Female Roman Catholic
Harrington Katie 43 Female Roman Catholic
Carroll Jane 73 Female Roman Catholic
Fatturs Kate 18 Female Roman Catholic
Corre Catherine 76 Female Roman Catholic
Mc Donnell Mary 34 Female Roman Catholic
OConnor Molly 73 Female Roman Catholic
Barrett Mary 59 Female Roman Catholic
Madigan Annie 53 Female Roman Catholic
Warton Mary 38 Female Roman Catholic
Gettans Hanah 42 Female Roman Catholic
Lunhan Catherine 29 Female Roman Catholic
Watson Mary 45 Female Roman Catholic
Purcell Ellen 50 Female Roman Catholic
Kildea Mary 75 Female Roman Catholic
Sloan Rose 36 Female Roman Catholic
Moylan Mary 45 Female Roman Catholic
Reddan Mary 35 Female Roman Catholic
Hanagan Annie 33 Female Roman Catholic
Bourke Mary 41 Female Roman Catholic
Mc Dermott Bridget 24 Female Roman Catholic
Griffin Norah 28 Female

 

Williams Elizabeth 19 Female Roman Catholic
Quinlan Mary 18 Female Roman Catholic
Condren Mary 17 Female Roman Catholic
Nagle Kate 17 Female Roman Catholic
Twohey Elizabeth 17 Female Roman Catholic
O’ Halloran Kate 17 Female Roman Catholic
Regan Elizabeth 17 Female Roman Catholic
Long Hannah 15 Female Roman Catholic
Campbell Mary 17 Female Roman Catholic
Twohey Ellen 16 Female Roman Catholic
Guerin Kate 16 Female Roman Catholic
Kennedy Kathleen 16 Female Roman Catholic
Fitzgerald Josephine 16 Female Roman Catholic
Barry Margaret 15 Female Roman Catholic
Whelan Christina 15 Female Roman Catholic
Noonan Christina 15 Female Roman Catholic
Guerin Bridget 16 Female Roman Catholic
Ryan Bridget 14 Female Roman Catholic
Mc Mahon Elizabeth 15 Female Roman Catholic
Leahy Christina 16 Female Roman Catholic
Sexton Elizabeth 16 Female Roman Catholic
Walshe Margaret 15 Female Roman Catholic
Sheridan Catherine 16 Female Roman Catholic
Sheridan Elizabeth 15 Female Roman Catholic
O’ Halloran Nora 14 Female Roman Catholic
Browne Mary A 14 Female Roman Catholic
Foley Mary 13 Female Roman Catholic
Burns Mary 13 Female Roman Catholic
Moriarty Mary 15 Female Roman Catholic
O’ Driscoll Mary 15 Female Roman Catholic
Heffernan Ellen 17 Female
Quinn Bridget 14 Female Roman Catholic
Creaton Ellen 15 Female Roman Catholic
Carney Mary 14 Female Roman Catholic
Barry Sarah 13 Female Roman Catholic
Smith Christina 13 Female Roman Catholic
Mc Grath Annie 14 Female Roman Catholic
Mc Grath Agnes 13 Female Roman Catholic
Magee Mary 14 Female Roman Catholic
Murray Christina 16 Female Roman Catholic
Fitzgerald Margaret 15 Female Roman Catholic
Mc Carthy Mary 12 Female Roman Catholic
Mc Carthy Margaret 12 Female Roman Catholic
Guinane Christina 13 Female Roman Catholic
Guinane Bridget 11 Female Roman Catholic
Doyle Margaret 13 Female Roman Catholic
Qulligan Margaret 13 Female Roman Catholic
Collins Ellen 14 Female Roman Catholic
Russell Kate 14 Female Roman Catholic
Russell Lily 13 Female Roman Catholic
Gallaghan Mary A 13 Female Roman Catholic
Reardon Mary 15 Female Roman Catholic
Quilligan Margaret 13 Female Roman Catholic
Harrington Mary 13 Female Roman Catholic
Harrington Ellen 12 Female Roman Catholic
Blake Margaret 14 Female Roman Catholic
Lowe Nora 12 Female Roman Catholic
Mangan Mary A 12 Female Roman Catholic
Mangan Ellen 11 Female Roman Catholic
Spencer Emma 14 Female Roman Catholic
Quinn Agnes 13 Female Roman Catholic
Quinn Mary 12 Female Roman Catholic
Quinn Hannah 11 Female Roman Catholic
Long Mary 14 Female Roman Catholic
Casey Ellen 14 Female Roman Catholic
Ronan Mary 13 Female Roman Catholic
Blackhall Christina 13 Female Roman Catholic
Sexton Esther 14 Female Roman Catholic
Hickey Helena 10 Female Roman Catholic
Mc Mahon Catherine 11 Female Roman Catholic
Hoar Catherine 12 Female Roman Catholic
Restall Maud 14 Female Roman Catholic
Russell Bridget 11 Female Roman Catholic
Regan Hannah 10 Female Roman Catholic
Kiely Ellen 16 Female Roman Catholic
Whelan Mary 11 Female Roman Catholic
Condren Bride 12 Female Roman Catholic
Neville Mary 13 Female Roman Catholic
Lane Winifred 13 Female Roman Catholic
Cusack Mary 12 Female Roman Catholic
Mc Mahon Helena 11 Female Roman Catholic
Mc Mahon Kate 11 Female Roman Catholic
Fean Mary 11 Female Roman Catholic
Fean Bridget 10 Female Roman Catholic
Blackhall Mary 11 Female Roman Catholic
Sullivan Bridget 14 Female Roman Catholic
Bell Mary 10 Female Roman Catholic
Maher Kathleen 12 Female Roman Catholic
Mc Grath Julia 11 Female Roman Catholic
Curtin Joan 12 Female Roman Catholic
Markham Christina 12 Female Roman Catholic
Connery Ellen 12 Female Roman Catholic
Dowd Kate 10 Female Roman Catholic
Bulter Delia 11 Female Roman Catholic
Foley Eileen 12 Female Roman Catholic
Foley Kathleen 10 Female Roman Catholic
Quinn Christina 11 Female Roman Catholic
Scanlon Mary 12 Female Roman Catholic
Blake Angela 11 Female Roman Catholic
Hannery Kate 10 Female Roman Catholic
Fitzgerald Kate 12 Female Roman Catholic
Kearney Margaret 9 Female Roman Catholic
Stewart Rose 13 Female Roman Catholic
Stewart Margaret 10 Female Roman Catholic
Campbell Ellen 9 Female Roman Catholic
Mc Mahon Ellen 10 Female Roman Catholic
Lyttle Christina 11 Female Roman Catholic
Curtin Margaret 10 Female
Moloney Elizabeth 11 Female Roman Catholic
Casey Josephine 13 Female Roman Catholic
Mc Gill Josephine 12 Female Roman Catholic
Hannen Christina 7 Female Roman Catholic
Foley Annie 7 Female Roman Catholic
Meagher Maureen 6 Female Roman Catholic
Dowd Lily 7 Female Roman Catholic
Dowd Bridget 6 Female Roman Catholic
Cantillon Mary 9 Female Roman Catholic
Cantillon Eileen 7 Female Roman Catholic
Cantillon Rita 6 Female Roman Catholic
Twohey Mary 6 Female Roman Catholic
Sinnot Agnes 9 Female Roman Catholic
Quilligan Mary 8 Female Roman Catholic
Mangan Madge 8 Female Roman Catholic
Cusack Kathleen 8 Female Roman Catholic
Cusack Margaret 7 Female Roman Catholic
Lake Bridget 6 Female Roman Catholic
Quinn Sarah 6 Female Roman Catholic
Shannon Anne 8 Female Roman Catholic
Shannon Eva 7 Female Roman Catholic
Shannon Lily 3 Female Roman Catholic
Clifford May 6 Female Roman Catholic
Farrell Teresa 4 Female Roman Catholic
Hayes Delia 8 Female Roman Catholic
Hickey Alice 8 Female Roman Catholic
Hoar Nora 11 Female Roman Catholic
Mc Donagh Bridget 7 Female Roman Catholic
Russell Bridget 12 Female Roman Catholic
Powell Alice 11 Female Roman Catholic
Lane Mary 8 Female Roman Catholic
Lane Lily 6 Female Roman Catholic
Fennell Annie 1 Female Roman Catholic
Dunne Mary 15 Female R Catholic
Corcoran Nora 14 Female R Catholic
Hamilton Anne 18 Female R Catholic
Callaghan Mary 13 Female R Catholic
Mulcahy Mary 17 Female R Catholic
Riely Mary 16 Female R Catholic
Toomey Mgt 18 Female R Catholic
Callaghan Mgt 14 Female R Catholic
Courtney Mgt 17 Female R Catholic
Sullivan Nora 17 Female R Catholic
Higgins Mary 17 Female R Catholic
Isherwood Alice 15 Female R Catholic
Maher Rose 15 Female R Catholic
Gibbons Rose 16 Female R Catholic
Doyle Anne 17 Female R Catholic
Smyth Mgt 13 Female R Catholic
Clarke Mary 13 Female R Catholic
Donnelly Mary 14 Female R Catholic
Ried Christina R Catholic
Daly Kate 13 Female R Catholic
Byron Mgt 13 Female R Catholic
Scully Eliza 17 Female R Catholic
Sheridan Christina 17 Female R Catholic
Mc Bride Ellen 16 Female R Catholic
Fleming Mgt 18 Female R Catholic
Kennedy Mary 18 Female R Catholic
Moore Kate 17 Female R Catholic
Carroll Kate 15 Female R Catholic
Whitman Susan 16 Female R Catholic
Connolly Mary 14 Female R Catholic
Mc Carthy Christina 13 Female R Catholic
Highland Christina 15 Female R Catholic
Purcel Johanna 15 Female R Catholic
Ballatyne Mary 17 Female R Catholic
Devlin Mary 17 Female R Catholic
Kane Emily 13 Female R Catholic
Kane Kate 14 Female R Catholic
Punter Eliza 16 Female R Catholic
Ahern Mgt 13 Female R Catholic
Higgins Eliza 13 Female R Catholic
Sullivan Mgt 18 Female R Catholic
Higgins Mary 15 Female R Catholic
Horgan Nora 13 Female R Catholic
Conaron Nora 14 Female R Catholic
Folan Mary 15 Female R Catholic
Connors Julia 16 Female R Catholic
Muldowny Mary 16 Female R Catholic
Sheridan Nora 14 Female R Catholic
Costigan Martha 15 Female R Catholic
Donohoe Nora 16 Female R Catholic
Fairbrother Anne 14 Female R Catholic
Moore Mgt 13 Female R Catholic
Carber Christina 13 Female R Catholic
Kennelly Anne 12 Female R Catholic
Donnling Mary 14 Female R Catholic
Higgins Lizzie 13 Female R Catholic
Holan Bina 12 Female R Catholic
Mc Donnell Mary 14 Female R Catholic
O’ Mara Lizzie 11 Female R Catholic
Noonan Mary 22

 

1911 Census

 

Categories
Crime Favourites Religion Society

The Magdalene Laundries Scandal

As usual, it has taken outside pressure to force acknowledgement of the imprisonment, torture and degradation inflicted on Irish women by this State and by the nuns who carried out the abuse.  The United Nations Committee Against Torture has published a report condemning Ireland for a crime.   Women who had children outside of marriage, or who might simply have been perceived as having a bright, cheerful spirit, were abducted by State agents and imprisoned for ever more.

The disgracefully-misnamed Magdalene laundries broke the spirit of thousands of women, enslaving them for the financial gain of warped, sexually-frustrated nuns who inflicted their vindictive self-hatred on these helpless prisoners.

Ireland being what it is, the government excluded the nuns’ gulags from the terms of reference of the Ryan report, no doubt hoping that the problem would go away as the former prisoners became older and more frail, but there it still is, an indictment on the confessional nature of this State from its foundation.

Let nobody tell you that the nuns and the priests and the brothers saved the State money by imprisoning these people.

They did not.

The religious orders made a handsome profit from their prisoners, through slavery.  And if they got a little sexual kick along the way, so much the better.

 

We have to acknowledge that the nuns who ran these prisons were deeply disturbed individuals, but their disorder seems to be widespread, and not just among those who controlled the Magdalene laundries.   There’s a creepy commonality in the stories told by women who attended nun-run schools, of violence, vindictiveness and small-minded cruelty.

The motif of the keys is the one that stands out most strongly.  Many women, including members of my own family, and also survivors of the laundries, describe being struck on the knuckles with bunches of keys by enraged nuns.  And this punishment always seems to have been administered coldly.

What was wrong with these women that made them so cruel, so callous and so angry?

In my opinion, it isn’t natural to live your entire life without sex, and I think the experience derailed them, but maybe that’s just me being a dirty bastard.  I don’t think so, though, and neither did the old women I grew up among who used to say the same thing, in less explicit terms.

I think these nuns, and all the other hated torturers in the schools and the laundries were so cruel because they were completely screwed up by being who and what they were.  And I think they took it out on the poor unfortunates who fell into their insane grip.

The sooner the crime of the Magdalene laundries is exposed, the better.  There are still nuns out there, walking around, who tortured, beat, enslaved and humiliated other women in the name of Christianity.  They should be held accountable now.

We have to exorcise all the ghosts haunting modern Ireland, until we finally acknowledge the disgrace that happened after independence, where absolute power was handed over to one church.

Until we do that, Ireland will never achieve maturity as a nation.

_____________________

Previously : The Magdalene Laundries

All Bock posts on the Ryan Report

All Bock posts on the Murphy Report

Ryan Commission report

Categories
Religion

The Magdalene Laundries

This is the mass grave in Limerick’s Mount Saint Lawrence cemetery where the victims of the Good Shepherd nuns are buried.  Read the names and recognise real people. These women served your parents or your grandparents, handed them their laundry and said Thanks Ma’am.  Nobody asked why, or by what authority, these women were imprisoned and enslaved.

Our society — my grandparents, your grandparents, your parents, my parents, were content to let these women slave their lives away in a prison run by nuns, and nobody asked why.

Shame on us.

___________________

Social Justice incarnated in the person of Jesus the Good Shepherd is our role model. The core Gospel values of human dignity, human rights and care of the environment are central to our mission. — Good Shepherd Sisters social justice policy

_________________
1911 Census
Guards:

Haugh Bridget 63 Female Head of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Cahill Margaret 55 Female Head of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Van Nuvenhove Amelia 90 Female Head of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Grennan Ellen 79 Female Head of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Keegan Teresa 79 Female Head of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
O’Keeffe Anne 71 Female Head of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Curtayne Mary 58 Female Head of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Raleigh Teresa Anne 59 Female Head of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Reddick Julianna 65 Female Head of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Lyne Margaret 56 Female Head of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
O’Meara Bridget 73 Female Head of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Kennedy Bessie 61 Female Head of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Delaney Johanna 64 Female Head of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Curtin Nora 57 Female Head of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Lynskey Margaret 55 Female Head of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Scholard Nora 41 Female Religious of the Good Shepherd Community Roman Catholic
Scott Fanny 46 Female Religious of the Good Shepherd Community Roman Catholic
Kearns Ellen 38 Female Religious of the Good Shepherd Community Roman Catholic
Comerford Mary 33 Female Religious of the Good Shepherd Community Roman Catholic
OSullivan Kate 45 Female Religious of the Good Shepherd Community Roman Catholic
Mc Auliffe Fanny 45 Female Religious of the Good Shepherd Community Roman Catholic
Comerford Kate 32 Female Religious of the Good Shepherd Community Roman Catholic
Webb Lizzie 30 Female Religious of the Good Shepherd Community Roman Catholic
Twohig Ellen 40 Female Religious of the Good Shepherd Community Roman Catholic
Howlett Kate 30 Female Religious of the Good Shepherd Community Roman Catholic
Murphy Margaret 29 Female Religious of the Good Shepherd Community Roman Catholic
OConnell Mary 25 Female Religious of the Good Shepherd Community Roman Catholic
White Mary 29 Female Religious of the Good Shepherd Community Roman Catholic
Hearn Florence 29 Female Religious of the Good Shepherd Community Roman Catholic
Cahill Helen 23 Female Religious of the Good Shepherd Community Roman Catholic
Kennedy Mary 55 Female Members of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Mc Carthy Kate 46 Female Members of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Calhane Jane 47 Female Members of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Mc Donnell Kate 40 Female Members of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Gannon Kate 42 Female Members of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Prendergast Mary 47 Female Members of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Mc Donagh Agnes 43 Female Members of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Heara Bridget 47 Female Members of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
O’Dwyer Agnes 40 Female Members of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Hogan Bridget 41 Female Members of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
O’Mahony Mary 36 Female Members of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Cregan Johana 42 Female Members of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
ODriscoll Margaret 39 Female Members of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
OKeeffe Aileen 39 Female Members of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Fennelly Sara 40 Female Members of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
OConnell Johanna 65 Female Members of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
ONeill Honora 64 Female Members of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Tyrrell Mary 49 Female Members of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Mc Mahon Margaret 52 Female Members of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Boyle Mary 47 Female Members of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Buckley Margaret 44 Female Members of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Hanrahan Mary 50 Female Members of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Ryan Kate 45 Female Members of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
O’Shaughnessy Mary 45 Female Members of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Kelly Agnes 37 Female Members of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Fitzgibbon Mary 35 Female Members of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Connolly Kate 31 Female Members of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Murphy Ellen 34 Female Members of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Connolly Mary 30 Female Members of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Hickey Joan 27 Female Members of the Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Lyne Mary 60 Female Head of the Noviciate of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Whelan Mary 24 Female Head of the Noviciate of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Lawless Margaret 29 Female Head of the Noviciate of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Quinlan Alice 25 Female Head of the Noviciate of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Mc Carthy Nora 26 Female Head of the Noviciate of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Hickey Ellen 23 Female Head of the Noviciate of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Mullins Mary 27 Female Head of the Noviciate of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Kehoe Mary 33 Female Head of the Noviciate of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
O’Brien Josephine 20 Female Head of the Noviciate of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Laffan Kate 26 Female Head of the Noviciate of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
O’Loughlin Bridget 23 Female Head of the Noviciate of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Kelly Teresa 20 Female Head of the Noviciate of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Brooks Kathleen 21 Female Head of the Noviciate of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Boland Kate 27 Female Head of the Noviciate of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Conway Cecilia 22 Female Head of the Noviciate of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Mc Evay Ellen 30 Female Members of Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Maloney Sara 45 Female Members of Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Mahon Lizzie 41 Female Members of Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Flynn Hanna 39 Female Members of Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
OConnell Johanna 34 Female Members of Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
OConnor Eliza 37 Female Members of Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Curran Mary 36 Female Members of Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Loughren Lizzie 31 Female Members of Community of the Good Shepherd Roman Catholic
Collins Mary 20 Female Visitor Roman Catholic
Collins Nora 18 Female Visitor Roman Catholic
Collins Constance 16 Female Visitor Roman Catholic
Gillispie Kate 25 Female Roman Catholic
McNamara Anne 29 Female Roman Catholic
Doolan Anne 50 Female Roman Catholic
Farrell Rosanna 20 Female Roman Catholic
OConnor Mary 55 Female Roman Catholic
Mc Auliffe Maggie 25 Female Roman Catholic
Cournane Mary 32 Female Roman Catholic
Omara Mary 25 Female Roman Catholic
Neal Mary 30 Female Roman Catholic
Browne Ennly 37 Female Roman Catholic
Nearty Maggie 29 Female Roman Catholic
Kennedy Crissie 18 Female Roman Catholic
Conway Sarah 18 Female Roman Catholic
Murphy Nano 56 Female Roman Catholic
Tierney Catherine 35 Female Roman Catholic
ONeill Johanna 50 Female Roman Catholic
Boyd Agnes 19 Female Roman Catholic
Fennell Kate 28 Female Roman Catholic
Cahill Kate 21 Female Roman Catholic
Callaghan Bride 18 Female Roman Catholic
Ellis Norab 51 Female Roman Catholic
Luzzia Norab 45 Female Roman Catholic
Moore Mary 22 Female Roman Catholic
Martya Kate 17 Female Roman Catholic
Reddan Mary 50 Female Roman Catholic
Gallaher Norah 50 Female Roman Catholic
Mcamy Ellie 19 Female Roman Catholic
Roche Lizzie 29 Female Roman Catholic
Murphy Mary 18 Female Roman Catholic
Laughnane Mary 16 Female Roman Catholic
Richey Jannie 65 Female Roman Catholic
Harrington Julia 28 Female Roman Catholic
Webbe Mary 22 Female Roman Catholic
Slaymaker Ellie 42 Female Roman Catholic
Mulhall Maggie 18 Female Roman Catholic
Moloney Ellie 22 Female Roman Catholic
Molloy Mary 70 Female Roman Catholic
Sheehan Mary 45 Female Roman Catholic
Sheehy Catherine 56 Female Roman Catholic
OConnor Molly 40 Female Roman Catholic
Lowe Isabel 42 Female Roman Catholic
Quinlan Mary 73 Female Roman Catholic
Ryan Margaret 45 Female Roman Catholic
Brohan Annie 20 Female Roman Catholic
ODwyer Mary 24 Female Roman Catholic
OMoore Norah 65 Female Roman Catholic
Fitzgerald Jannie 48 Female Roman Catholic
Madigan Mary 49 Female Roman Catholic
Noonan Kate 50 Female Roman Catholic
Gleeson Grace 31 Female Roman Catholic
Geraghty Mary 44 Female Roman Catholic
Dunne Mary 48 Female Roman Catholic
OConnor Kate 48 Female Roman Catholic
Keogh Mary 41 Female Roman Catholic
Murray Mary 50 Female Roman Catholic
Mc Malon Annie 45 Female Roman Catholic
Mc Namara Mary 28 Female Roman Catholic
Sisk Mary 21 Female Roman Catholic
Cotter Sarah 50 Female Roman Catholic
Hoffman Delia 45 Female Roman Catholic
Reddan Mary 43 Female Roman Catholic
O Shaughnessy Josephine 20 Female Roman Catholic
Mc Donagh Winnie 47 Female Roman Catholic
Ratigan Bridget 20 Female Roman Catholic
Flanagan Maggie 17 Female Roman Catholic
ONeill Louisa 31 Female Roman Catholic
Dempsey Maggie 22 Female Roman Catholic
Dowe Mary 63 Female Roman Catholic
Rice Katie 22 Female Roman Catholic
Gallagher Nellie 18 Female Roman Catholic
Edwards Delia 33 Female Roman Catholic
Trennich Teresa 25 Female Roman Catholic
O Kieffe Ellie 70 Female Roman Catholic
Barrett Mary 35 Female Roman Catholic
Harrington Katie 43 Female Roman Catholic
Carroll Jane 73 Female Roman Catholic
Fatturs Kate 18 Female Roman Catholic
Corre Catherine 76 Female Roman Catholic
Mc Donnell Mary 34 Female Roman Catholic
OConnor Molly 73 Female Roman Catholic
Barrett Mary 59 Female Roman Catholic
Madigan Annie 53 Female Roman Catholic
Warton Mary 38 Female Roman Catholic
Gettans Hanah 42 Female Roman Catholic
Lunhan Catherine 29 Female Roman Catholic
Watson Mary 45 Female Roman Catholic
Purcell Ellen 50 Female Roman Catholic
Kildea Mary 75 Female Roman Catholic
Sloan Rose 36 Female Roman Catholic
Moylan Mary 45 Female Roman Catholic
Reddan Mary 35 Female Roman Catholic
Hanagan Annie 33 Female Roman Catholic
Bourke Mary 41 Female Roman Catholic
Mc Dermott Bridget 24 Female Roman Catholic
Griffin Norah 28 Female Roman Catholic
Prisoners:

 

Williams Elizabeth 19 Female Roman Catholic
Quinlan Mary 18 Female Roman Catholic
Condren Mary 17 Female Roman Catholic
Nagle Kate 17 Female Roman Catholic
Twohey Elizabeth 17 Female Roman Catholic
O’ Halloran Kate 17 Female Roman Catholic
Regan Elizabeth 17 Female Roman Catholic
Long Hannah 15 Female Roman Catholic
Campbell Mary 17 Female Roman Catholic
Twohey Ellen 16 Female Roman Catholic
Guerin Kate 16 Female Roman Catholic
Kennedy Kathleen 16 Female Roman Catholic
Fitzgerald Josephine 16 Female Roman Catholic
Barry Margaret 15 Female Roman Catholic
Whelan Christina 15 Female Roman Catholic
Noonan Christina 15 Female Roman Catholic
Guerin Bridget 16 Female Roman Catholic
Ryan Bridget 14 Female Roman Catholic
Mc Mahon Elizabeth 15 Female Roman Catholic
Leahy Christina 16 Female Roman Catholic
Sexton Elizabeth 16 Female Roman Catholic
Walshe Margaret 15 Female Roman Catholic
Sheridan Catherine 16 Female Roman Catholic
Sheridan Elizabeth 15 Female Roman Catholic
O’ Halloran Nora 14 Female Roman Catholic
Browne Mary A 14 Female Roman Catholic
Foley Mary 13 Female Roman Catholic
Burns Mary 13 Female Roman Catholic
Moriarty Mary 15 Female Roman Catholic
O’ Driscoll Mary 15 Female Roman Catholic
Heffernan Ellen 17 Female
Quinn Bridget 14 Female Roman Catholic
Creaton Ellen 15 Female Roman Catholic
Carney Mary 14 Female Roman Catholic
Barry Sarah 13 Female Roman Catholic
Smith Christina 13 Female Roman Catholic
Mc Grath Annie 14 Female Roman Catholic
Mc Grath Agnes 13 Female Roman Catholic
Magee Mary 14 Female Roman Catholic
Murray Christina 16 Female Roman Catholic
Fitzgerald Margaret 15 Female Roman Catholic
Mc Carthy Mary 12 Female Roman Catholic
Mc Carthy Margaret 12 Female Roman Catholic
Guinane Christina 13 Female Roman Catholic
Guinane Bridget 11 Female Roman Catholic
Doyle Margaret 13 Female Roman Catholic
Qulligan Margaret 13 Female Roman Catholic
Collins Ellen 14 Female Roman Catholic
Russell Kate 14 Female Roman Catholic
Russell Lily 13 Female Roman Catholic
Gallaghan Mary A 13 Female Roman Catholic
Reardon Mary 15 Female Roman Catholic
Quilligan Margaret 13 Female Roman Catholic
Harrington Mary 13 Female Roman Catholic
Harrington Ellen 12 Female Roman Catholic
Blake Margaret 14 Female Roman Catholic
Lowe Nora 12 Female Roman Catholic